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Seed protein improvement in cereals and grain legumes. Proceedings of an international symposium jointly organized by the IAEA and the FAO in co-operation with the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH and held in Neuherberg, 4-8 September 1978

Abstract

Plant breeders, molecular biologists, analytical chemists and nutritionists report on progress and achievements to date. High-lysine genotypes of maize, barley and sorghum have been produced. One high-protein variety of wheat is reported available for commercial use. Grain legumes already have high seed protein content but, compared to cereals, less of the total biological yield is available as seed, and intensive efforts are being made to produce genotypes with higher seed yield. Genetic variability is available from world germplasm collections and from induced-mutation programmes. In the basic sciences considerable advances are reported. Putative structural genes determining protein quality and quantity have been located on various chromosomes. In vitro synthesis of legume and cereal storage proteins and the isolation of some mRNA and the preparation and cloning of cDNA have been reported. Uptake and incorporation of N into amino acids, their synthesis into proteins, and interaction between protein and carbohydrate biosynthesis during seed development are discussed. Future prospects are considered including potential selection at the cellular rather than the whole plant level. In only a minority of the 64 papers is the use of nuclear techniques indicated specifically enough to justify individual entries in INIS.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1979
Product Type:
Conference
Reference Number:
AIX-10-463285; EDB-80-036986
Resource Relation:
Conference: International symposium on seed protein improvement in cereals and grain legumes, Neuherberg, Germany, F.R., 4 - 8 Sep 1978
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CARBOHYDRATES; BIOSYNTHESIS; CEREALS; GENETIC VARIABILITY; PLANT BREEDING; MEETINGS; PROTEINS; BARLEY; LEGUMINOSAE; MAIZE; MUTANTS; NITROGEN; PRODUCTIVITY; SEEDS; BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY; CRYOGENIC FLUIDS; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; GRAMINEAE; GRASS; NONMETALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PLANTS; SYNTHESIS; 553000* - Agriculture & Food Technology
OSTI ID:
5524886
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
Pages: v.2 472 p.
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Not Available. Seed protein improvement in cereals and grain legumes. Proceedings of an international symposium jointly organized by the IAEA and the FAO in co-operation with the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH and held in Neuherberg, 4-8 September 1978. IAEA: N. p., 1979. Web.
Not Available. Seed protein improvement in cereals and grain legumes. Proceedings of an international symposium jointly organized by the IAEA and the FAO in co-operation with the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH and held in Neuherberg, 4-8 September 1978. IAEA.
Not Available. 1979. "Seed protein improvement in cereals and grain legumes. Proceedings of an international symposium jointly organized by the IAEA and the FAO in co-operation with the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH and held in Neuherberg, 4-8 September 1978." IAEA.
@misc{etde_5524886,
title = {Seed protein improvement in cereals and grain legumes. Proceedings of an international symposium jointly organized by the IAEA and the FAO in co-operation with the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH and held in Neuherberg, 4-8 September 1978}
author = {Not Available}
abstractNote = {Plant breeders, molecular biologists, analytical chemists and nutritionists report on progress and achievements to date. High-lysine genotypes of maize, barley and sorghum have been produced. One high-protein variety of wheat is reported available for commercial use. Grain legumes already have high seed protein content but, compared to cereals, less of the total biological yield is available as seed, and intensive efforts are being made to produce genotypes with higher seed yield. Genetic variability is available from world germplasm collections and from induced-mutation programmes. In the basic sciences considerable advances are reported. Putative structural genes determining protein quality and quantity have been located on various chromosomes. In vitro synthesis of legume and cereal storage proteins and the isolation of some mRNA and the preparation and cloning of cDNA have been reported. Uptake and incorporation of N into amino acids, their synthesis into proteins, and interaction between protein and carbohydrate biosynthesis during seed development are discussed. Future prospects are considered including potential selection at the cellular rather than the whole plant level. In only a minority of the 64 papers is the use of nuclear techniques indicated specifically enough to justify individual entries in INIS.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1979}
month = {Jan}
}