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Energy for Japan's new industrial frontier

Journal Article:

Abstract

Systematic responses by the Japanese government and industry to the successive oil crises of the 1970s are yielding remarkable results; instead of the most vulnerable and technologically-dependent energy system in the world, Japanese industry is emerging as one of the world's most energy-efficient and a major source of the most advanced energy technologies. By the end of the century, if best available prognoses on fusion power technology prove close to accurate, Japan's energy industry will have assumed a technological leadership akin to that of its steel industry today. Significant energy conservation has been achieved by concerted efforts to promote less energy-intensive industries and by advances in technology and equipment for reducing energy consumption in key industries. In 1980, the Japanese government set targets for the development of new energy sources for the coming decade, which, if realized, will contribute substantially to a three-fold increase in non-petroleum energy supply by 1990, and a further doubling of alternative energy supplies by the end of the century. By the year 2000, Japanese reliance on petroleum is expected to decline from 88% in 1977 to 74.9%.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 1983
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-84-021910
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy (Oxford); (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 8:6
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; JAPAN; ENERGY POLICY; ENERGY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; ASIA; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY SOURCES; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; 291000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Conservation; 292000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Supply, Demand & Forecasting
OSTI ID:
5489746
Research Organizations:
Department of Comparative Culture, Sophia University, Tokyo
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ENEYD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 481-490
Announcement Date:
Dec 01, 1983

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Gregory, G. Energy for Japan's new industrial frontier. United Kingdom: N. p., 1983. Web.
Gregory, G. Energy for Japan's new industrial frontier. United Kingdom.
Gregory, G. 1983. "Energy for Japan's new industrial frontier." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_5489746,
title = {Energy for Japan's new industrial frontier}
author = {Gregory, G}
abstractNote = {Systematic responses by the Japanese government and industry to the successive oil crises of the 1970s are yielding remarkable results; instead of the most vulnerable and technologically-dependent energy system in the world, Japanese industry is emerging as one of the world's most energy-efficient and a major source of the most advanced energy technologies. By the end of the century, if best available prognoses on fusion power technology prove close to accurate, Japan's energy industry will have assumed a technological leadership akin to that of its steel industry today. Significant energy conservation has been achieved by concerted efforts to promote less energy-intensive industries and by advances in technology and equipment for reducing energy consumption in key industries. In 1980, the Japanese government set targets for the development of new energy sources for the coming decade, which, if realized, will contribute substantially to a three-fold increase in non-petroleum energy supply by 1990, and a further doubling of alternative energy supplies by the end of the century. By the year 2000, Japanese reliance on petroleum is expected to decline from 88% in 1977 to 74.9%.}
journal = {Energy (Oxford); (United Kingdom)}
volume = {8:6}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1983}
month = {Jun}
}