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Influence of phase separation on the anaerobic digestion of glucose-II stability, and kinetic responses to shock loadings

Journal Article:

Abstract

A mineral medium, containing 1% (w/v) glucose as the main carbon source, was subjected to one-phase and to two-phase anaerobic digestion processes under comparable conditions. The one-phase system consisted of an anaerobic up-flow reactor containing both acidogenic as well as methanogenic populations. The two-phase system consisted of an acid reactor and a methane reactor connected in series allowing sequential acidogenesis and methanogenesis of the glucose. After maximum turnover rates of glucose had been attained in both systems, by gradually increasing feed supply rate, both systems were switched to the batch mode and subjected to shock loadings with glucose or fatty acids. Maximum specific turnover rates of fatty acids in the one-phase process averaged 0.39 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)-g biomass/sup -1/ d/sup -1/ and 2.23 g g/sup -1/ d/sup -1/ for the methane reactor of the two-phase system. Charging the one-phase system with doses of glucose resulted mainly in an accumulation of propionate which was degraded relatively slowly. It was concluded that interspecies hydrogen transfer may become rate limiting at high loading rates, stimulating formation of propionate. Therefore a two-phase system, as compared with a one-phase digestion process for easily hydrolyzable carbohyrates, was characterized as being essentially the more stable.
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1982
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-82-088129
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Water Res.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 16:4
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; GLUCOSE; ANAEROBIC DIGESTION; METHANE; PRODUCTION; ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS; CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTERS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; METHANOGENIC BACTERIA; PH VALUE; ALDEHYDES; ALKANES; BACTERIA; BIOCONVERSION; CARBOHYDRATES; DIGESTION; ESTERS; HEXOSES; HYDROCARBONS; MANAGEMENT; MICROORGANISMS; MONOSACCHARIDES; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PROCESSING; SACCHARIDES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING; 090122* - Hydrocarbon Fuels- Preparation from Wastes or Biomass- (1976-1989)
OSTI ID:
5465217
Research Organizations:
Univ. of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: WATRA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 449-455
Announcement Date:
May 01, 1982

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Cohen, A, Breure, A M, Van Andel, J G, and Van Deursen, A. Influence of phase separation on the anaerobic digestion of glucose-II stability, and kinetic responses to shock loadings. United Kingdom: N. p., 1982. Web.
Cohen, A, Breure, A M, Van Andel, J G, & Van Deursen, A. Influence of phase separation on the anaerobic digestion of glucose-II stability, and kinetic responses to shock loadings. United Kingdom.
Cohen, A, Breure, A M, Van Andel, J G, and Van Deursen, A. 1982. "Influence of phase separation on the anaerobic digestion of glucose-II stability, and kinetic responses to shock loadings." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_5465217,
title = {Influence of phase separation on the anaerobic digestion of glucose-II stability, and kinetic responses to shock loadings}
author = {Cohen, A, Breure, A M, Van Andel, J G, and Van Deursen, A}
abstractNote = {A mineral medium, containing 1% (w/v) glucose as the main carbon source, was subjected to one-phase and to two-phase anaerobic digestion processes under comparable conditions. The one-phase system consisted of an anaerobic up-flow reactor containing both acidogenic as well as methanogenic populations. The two-phase system consisted of an acid reactor and a methane reactor connected in series allowing sequential acidogenesis and methanogenesis of the glucose. After maximum turnover rates of glucose had been attained in both systems, by gradually increasing feed supply rate, both systems were switched to the batch mode and subjected to shock loadings with glucose or fatty acids. Maximum specific turnover rates of fatty acids in the one-phase process averaged 0.39 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)-g biomass/sup -1/ d/sup -1/ and 2.23 g g/sup -1/ d/sup -1/ for the methane reactor of the two-phase system. Charging the one-phase system with doses of glucose resulted mainly in an accumulation of propionate which was degraded relatively slowly. It was concluded that interspecies hydrogen transfer may become rate limiting at high loading rates, stimulating formation of propionate. Therefore a two-phase system, as compared with a one-phase digestion process for easily hydrolyzable carbohyrates, was characterized as being essentially the more stable.}
journal = {Water Res.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {16:4}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1982}
month = {Jan}
}