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Parameters and mechanisms in the mechanical upgrading of Athabasca oil sands by a cold water process

Technical Report:

Abstract

The efficiency of sand rejection in the cold water mechanical upgrading of Athabasca oil sands has been studied in the operation of rotary contactors of 8.9 cm and 19.0 cm internal diameter, fitted with lifters. Duration of operation, rate of rotation, linear velocity of lifters, temperature, water to oil sands ratio, depth of charge to lifter height ratio, and internal diameter of the contactor have been identified as important parameters. Surfactant addition and presoaking of the feed had negligible effects on the process. A model has been proposed that accounts for the variation of extraction efficiency as a function of duration of operation, the data showing that both the equilibrium extraction efficiency and the rate constant were greater in the large contactor than the small contactor for equal rates of rotation, except when centrifuging occurred in the large contactor. Sand rejection was promoted by lifter-sand and contactor wall-sand impacts and by the action of shear fields within vortices created by the lifter. The impacts occurred for all loading conditions but the latter mechanism only contributed to the sand rejection process for depth-of-charge to lifter height ratios of one or greater. In addition, the contribution of shear fields was only significant  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1977
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
TU/CEAC-77; MICROLOG-81-1182
Reference Number:
CANM-88-000748; EDB-88-071830
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; COLD-WATER PROCESSES; OIL SANDS; SEPARATION EQUIPMENT; PERFORMANCE; ATHABASCA DEPOSIT; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; BITUMENS; EFFICIENCY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; TEMPERATURE EFFECTS; BITUMINOUS MATERIALS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUID INJECTION PROCESSES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; MATERIALS; OIL SAND DEPOSITS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; TAR; 040402* - Oil Shales & Tar Sands- Surface Methods
OSTI ID:
5462973
Research Organizations:
Toronto Univ., Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
CANMET/TID, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, 555 Booth St., Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0G1. $0.34 CAN per page, $3.40 minimum; MF $10 CAN.
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: 145
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Grant, G B. Parameters and mechanisms in the mechanical upgrading of Athabasca oil sands by a cold water process. Canada: N. p., 1977. Web.
Grant, G B. Parameters and mechanisms in the mechanical upgrading of Athabasca oil sands by a cold water process. Canada.
Grant, G B. 1977. "Parameters and mechanisms in the mechanical upgrading of Athabasca oil sands by a cold water process." Canada.
@misc{etde_5462973,
title = {Parameters and mechanisms in the mechanical upgrading of Athabasca oil sands by a cold water process}
author = {Grant, G B}
abstractNote = {The efficiency of sand rejection in the cold water mechanical upgrading of Athabasca oil sands has been studied in the operation of rotary contactors of 8.9 cm and 19.0 cm internal diameter, fitted with lifters. Duration of operation, rate of rotation, linear velocity of lifters, temperature, water to oil sands ratio, depth of charge to lifter height ratio, and internal diameter of the contactor have been identified as important parameters. Surfactant addition and presoaking of the feed had negligible effects on the process. A model has been proposed that accounts for the variation of extraction efficiency as a function of duration of operation, the data showing that both the equilibrium extraction efficiency and the rate constant were greater in the large contactor than the small contactor for equal rates of rotation, except when centrifuging occurred in the large contactor. Sand rejection was promoted by lifter-sand and contactor wall-sand impacts and by the action of shear fields within vortices created by the lifter. The impacts occurred for all loading conditions but the latter mechanism only contributed to the sand rejection process for depth-of-charge to lifter height ratios of one or greater. In addition, the contribution of shear fields was only significant for large water to oil sands ratios. Finally, the sand rejection process was affected significantly by variations in temperature. 37 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs., 4 illus.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1977}
month = {Jan}
}