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Effect of chronic copper poisoning on the kidneys of sheep

Journal Article:

Abstract

The effect of copper poisoning on kidneys was studied in 16 housed sheep given a daily drench of copper sulfate at the rate of 20 mg CuSO/sub 4/5H/sub 2/O per kg body weight. Seven similar sheep were kept as controls. All sheep were bled and weighed at weekly intervals, urine was collected via a catheter from groups of sheep at varying times and animals were killed in groups throughout the experiment. Nine sheep were allowed to develop the hemolytic crisis. Prior to hemolysis copper levels in the liver and copper and iron levels in the kidneys rose significantly, eosinophilic intracytoplasmic granules became numerous in the epithelium of the proximal convoluted tubules (PCT), but significant changes were not detected by the histochemical methods used nor was kidney function impaired. In the animals that developed hemolysis there was degeneration, necrosis and loss of enzyme activity from the cells of the PCT. The tubule cells contained large amounts of hemoglobin, copper and iron and much of this material seemed to be localized in intracytoplasmic granules that were probably lysosomes. There was marked functional impairment at this time and blood urea levels began to rise. These lesions, an interstitial fibroblastic and inflammatory cell response  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1974
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-142575
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Res. Vet. Sci.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 16:1
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; COPPER; METABOLISM; TOXICITY; GLOMERULI; ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES; KIDNEYS; NECROSIS; SHEEP; INJURIES; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; CHRONIC EXPOSURE; COPPER SULFATES; ENZYME ACTIVITY; EPITHELIUM; HEMOGLOBIN; IRON; LIVER; PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; URINE; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BIOLOGICAL WASTES; BODY; BODY FLUIDS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; COPPER COMPOUNDS; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISTRIBUTION; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; ELEMENTS; GLANDS; GLOBIN; HETEROCYCLIC ACIDS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; METALS; MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PIGMENTS; PORPHYRINS; PROTEINS; RUMINANTS; SULFATES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; TISSUES; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; VERTEBRATES; WASTES; 560305* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Vertebrates- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
5443067
Research Organizations:
Univ. of Liverpool, England
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: RVTSA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 57-69
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Gopinath, C, Hall, G A, and Howell, J M.C. Effect of chronic copper poisoning on the kidneys of sheep. United Kingdom: N. p., 1974. Web.
Gopinath, C, Hall, G A, & Howell, J M.C. Effect of chronic copper poisoning on the kidneys of sheep. United Kingdom.
Gopinath, C, Hall, G A, and Howell, J M.C. 1974. "Effect of chronic copper poisoning on the kidneys of sheep." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_5443067,
title = {Effect of chronic copper poisoning on the kidneys of sheep}
author = {Gopinath, C, Hall, G A, and Howell, J M.C.}
abstractNote = {The effect of copper poisoning on kidneys was studied in 16 housed sheep given a daily drench of copper sulfate at the rate of 20 mg CuSO/sub 4/5H/sub 2/O per kg body weight. Seven similar sheep were kept as controls. All sheep were bled and weighed at weekly intervals, urine was collected via a catheter from groups of sheep at varying times and animals were killed in groups throughout the experiment. Nine sheep were allowed to develop the hemolytic crisis. Prior to hemolysis copper levels in the liver and copper and iron levels in the kidneys rose significantly, eosinophilic intracytoplasmic granules became numerous in the epithelium of the proximal convoluted tubules (PCT), but significant changes were not detected by the histochemical methods used nor was kidney function impaired. In the animals that developed hemolysis there was degeneration, necrosis and loss of enzyme activity from the cells of the PCT. The tubule cells contained large amounts of hemoglobin, copper and iron and much of this material seemed to be localized in intracytoplasmic granules that were probably lysosomes. There was marked functional impairment at this time and blood urea levels began to rise. These lesions, an interstitial fibroblastic and inflammatory cell response together with changes suggestive of tubular regeneration were seen in the posthemolytic group of sheep.}
journal = {Res. Vet. Sci.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {16:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1974}
month = {Jan}
}