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Cell inactivation by heavy charged particles

Conference:

Abstract

The inactivation of cells resulting in lethal or aberrant effects by charged particles is of growing interest. Charged particles at extremely high LET are capable of completely eliminating cell-type and cell-line differences in repair capacity. It is still not clear however whether the repair systems are inactivated, or merely that heavy-ion lesions are less repairable. Studies correlating the particle inactivation dose of radioresistant cells with intact DNA analyzed with pulse field gel electrophoresis and other techniques may be useful, but more experiments are also needed to assess the fidelity of repair. For particle irradiations between 40-100 keV/{mu}m there is however evidence for particle-induced activation of specific genes in mammalian cells, and certain repair processes in bacteria. New data are available on the inactivation of developmental processes in several systems including seeds, and cells of the nematode C. elegans. Future experimental and theoretical modeling research emphasis should focus on exploring particle-induced inactivation of endpoints assessing functionality and not just lethality, and on analyzing molecular damage and genetic effects arising in damage but non-inactivated survivors. The discrete nature of selective types of particle damage as a function of radiation quality indicates the value of accelerated ions as probes of normal and aberrant  More>>
Authors:
Blakely, E A [1] 
  1. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Cell and Molecular Biology Div.
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 1992
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-9109383-
Reference Number:
DEN-92-006506; EDB-92-098991
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiation and Environmental Biophysics; (Germany); Journal Volume: 31:3; Conference: 4. workshop on heavy charged particles in biology and medicine, Darmstadt (Germany), 23-25 Sep 1991
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; BIOLOGICAL REPAIR; RADIATION INJURIES; HEAVY IONS; CELL KILLING; RADIOBIOLOGY; BACTERIA; CELL CULTURES; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; INACTIVATION; ION BEAMS; KEV RANGE 10-100; LET; LETHAL IRRADIATION; RADIATION QUALITY; RADIOSENSITIVITY; REVIEWS; SEEDS; BEAMS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; BIOLOGY; CHARGED PARTICLES; DOCUMENT TYPES; ENERGY RANGE; ENERGY TRANSFER; INJURIES; IONS; IRRADIATION; KEV RANGE; MICROORGANISMS; RADIATION EFFECTS; REPAIR; 560120* - Radiation Effects on Biochemicals, Cells, & Tissue Culture; 560130 - Radiation Effects on Microorganisms; 560140 - Radiation Effects on Plants; 560152 - Radiation Effects on Animals- Animals
OSTI ID:
5375399
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0301-634X; CODEN: REBPA; Other: CNN: DE-AC03-76SF00098
Submitting Site:
DEN
Size:
Pages: 181-196
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Blakely, E A. Cell inactivation by heavy charged particles. Germany: N. p., 1992. Web.
Blakely, E A. Cell inactivation by heavy charged particles. Germany.
Blakely, E A. 1992. "Cell inactivation by heavy charged particles." Germany.
@misc{etde_5375399,
title = {Cell inactivation by heavy charged particles}
author = {Blakely, E A}
abstractNote = {The inactivation of cells resulting in lethal or aberrant effects by charged particles is of growing interest. Charged particles at extremely high LET are capable of completely eliminating cell-type and cell-line differences in repair capacity. It is still not clear however whether the repair systems are inactivated, or merely that heavy-ion lesions are less repairable. Studies correlating the particle inactivation dose of radioresistant cells with intact DNA analyzed with pulse field gel electrophoresis and other techniques may be useful, but more experiments are also needed to assess the fidelity of repair. For particle irradiations between 40-100 keV/{mu}m there is however evidence for particle-induced activation of specific genes in mammalian cells, and certain repair processes in bacteria. New data are available on the inactivation of developmental processes in several systems including seeds, and cells of the nematode C. elegans. Future experimental and theoretical modeling research emphasis should focus on exploring particle-induced inactivation of endpoints assessing functionality and not just lethality, and on analyzing molecular damage and genetic effects arising in damage but non-inactivated survivors. The discrete nature of selective types of particle damage as a function of radiation quality indicates the value of accelerated ions as probes of normal and aberrant biological processes. Information obtained from molecular analyses of damage and repair must however be integrated into the context of cellular and tissue functions of the organism. (orig.).}
journal = {Radiation and Environmental Biophysics; (Germany)}
volume = {31:3}
place = {Germany}
year = {1992}
month = {Jun}
}