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Hypoxial death inferred from thermally induced injuries at upper lethal temperatures, in the banded killifish, Fundulus diaphanus (LeSueur)

Journal Article:

Abstract

Banded killifish, Fundulus diaphanus (LeSueur), acclimated to 25/sup 0/C were subjected to upper lethal temperatures using a 10,000 min bioassay procedure. The incipient upper lethal temperature (LT/sub 50/) was about 34.5/sup 0/C. Histologic examination of heat-treated fish revealed no obvious injury to the heart, spleen, trunk musculature, eye, naris, integument, or digestive tract. Thermal stress induced progressive injury to the gills characterized by subepithelial edema, congestion of lamellar capillaries, and delamination of the respiratory epithelium from the pillar cell system. Areas of necrosis were observed in the lobus inferior of the hypothalamus and in the medulla oblongata. The pseudobranch epithelium was necrotic. Fatty change occurred in the liver. Acinar cells of the pancreas appeared autolytic and adjacent blood vessels damaged. Degenerative tubular changes and contracted glomerular tufts were noted in the kidney. The ovary was extremely temperature sensitive and displayed severe injury to oocytes and follicular cells after relatively short exposure to temperatures near the LT/sub 50/. It is proposed that primary thermally induced injury is to the gills. This results in abnormal gas exchange and osmoregulation and leads to pathologic changes in other tissues. Hypoxia of the central nervous system appears to be the ultimate cause of death.
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
ERA-03-016002; EDB-78-034246
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Can. J. Zool.; (Canada); Journal Volume: 55:10
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; FISHES; TEMPERATURE EFFECTS; THERMAL SHOCK; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOASSAY; GILLS; INJURIES; MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES; MORTALITY; PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES; TISSUES; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; BODY; DISEASES; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; VERTEBRATES; 560205* - Thermal Effects- Vertebrates- (-1987); 550900 - Pathology
OSTI ID:
5369475
Research Organizations:
Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: CJZOA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 1705-1719
Announcement Date:
Feb 01, 1978

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Rombough, P J, and Garside, E T. Hypoxial death inferred from thermally induced injuries at upper lethal temperatures, in the banded killifish, Fundulus diaphanus (LeSueur). Canada: N. p., 1977. Web.
Rombough, P J, & Garside, E T. Hypoxial death inferred from thermally induced injuries at upper lethal temperatures, in the banded killifish, Fundulus diaphanus (LeSueur). Canada.
Rombough, P J, and Garside, E T. 1977. "Hypoxial death inferred from thermally induced injuries at upper lethal temperatures, in the banded killifish, Fundulus diaphanus (LeSueur)." Canada.
@misc{etde_5369475,
title = {Hypoxial death inferred from thermally induced injuries at upper lethal temperatures, in the banded killifish, Fundulus diaphanus (LeSueur)}
author = {Rombough, P J, and Garside, E T}
abstractNote = {Banded killifish, Fundulus diaphanus (LeSueur), acclimated to 25/sup 0/C were subjected to upper lethal temperatures using a 10,000 min bioassay procedure. The incipient upper lethal temperature (LT/sub 50/) was about 34.5/sup 0/C. Histologic examination of heat-treated fish revealed no obvious injury to the heart, spleen, trunk musculature, eye, naris, integument, or digestive tract. Thermal stress induced progressive injury to the gills characterized by subepithelial edema, congestion of lamellar capillaries, and delamination of the respiratory epithelium from the pillar cell system. Areas of necrosis were observed in the lobus inferior of the hypothalamus and in the medulla oblongata. The pseudobranch epithelium was necrotic. Fatty change occurred in the liver. Acinar cells of the pancreas appeared autolytic and adjacent blood vessels damaged. Degenerative tubular changes and contracted glomerular tufts were noted in the kidney. The ovary was extremely temperature sensitive and displayed severe injury to oocytes and follicular cells after relatively short exposure to temperatures near the LT/sub 50/. It is proposed that primary thermally induced injury is to the gills. This results in abnormal gas exchange and osmoregulation and leads to pathologic changes in other tissues. Hypoxia of the central nervous system appears to be the ultimate cause of death.}
journal = {Can. J. Zool.; (Canada)}
volume = {55:10}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1977}
month = {Oct}
}