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Impact of acidification and eutrophication on macrophyte communities in soft waters in The Netherlands

Journal Article:

Abstract

During the last decades a strong decline has been noticed in the number of waters dominated by Littorellion species, mostly isoetids such as Lobelia dortmanna L., Isoetes lacustris L. and Littorella uniflora (L.) Aschers. Sixty-eight waters, which were known to be dominated by L. uniflora after 1950 were investigated. In 1980, L. uniflora appeared to be absent or to have strongly decreased in 53 (78%) of the waters. In 41 of them, Littorella had been replaced by submerged Juncus bulbosus L. and/or Sphagnum spp. These changes seem to have been caused by changed inorganic carbon budgets as a consequence of acidification. In the remaining 12 waters, eutrophication of the water and/or sediment seems to be responsible for the changes in the plant communities. Enrichment with phosphate of the mineral sediment alone, leads to luxurious growth of submerged, rooted macrophyte species such as Myriophyllum alterniflorum DC and Ranunculus peltatus Schrank, whereas phosphate-enrichment of both sediment and water leads to luxurious growth of pleustophytes such as Riccia fluitans L. and Lemna minor L. in small, shallow waters, and to plankton bloom and luxurious growth of epiphytes in larger, deeper waters. In these cases light limitation seems to be responsible for the disappearance  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1983
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-141570
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Aquat. Bot.; (Netherlands); Journal Volume: 17
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ACIDIFICATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; EUTROPHICATION; CARBON CYCLE; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; LAKES; NETHERLANDS; NUTRIENTS; PHOSPHATES; PLANT GROWTH; PLANTS; POPULATION DYNAMICS; STIMULATION; EUROPE; GROWTH; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS; SURFACE WATERS; WESTERN EUROPE; 520200* - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 560303 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
5360835
Research Organizations:
Catholic Univ., Nijmegen, Netherlands
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: AQBOD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 139-155
Announcement Date:
Sep 01, 1985

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Roelofs, J G.M. Impact of acidification and eutrophication on macrophyte communities in soft waters in The Netherlands. Netherlands: N. p., 1983. Web.
Roelofs, J G.M. Impact of acidification and eutrophication on macrophyte communities in soft waters in The Netherlands. Netherlands.
Roelofs, J G.M. 1983. "Impact of acidification and eutrophication on macrophyte communities in soft waters in The Netherlands." Netherlands.
@misc{etde_5360835,
title = {Impact of acidification and eutrophication on macrophyte communities in soft waters in The Netherlands}
author = {Roelofs, J G.M.}
abstractNote = {During the last decades a strong decline has been noticed in the number of waters dominated by Littorellion species, mostly isoetids such as Lobelia dortmanna L., Isoetes lacustris L. and Littorella uniflora (L.) Aschers. Sixty-eight waters, which were known to be dominated by L. uniflora after 1950 were investigated. In 1980, L. uniflora appeared to be absent or to have strongly decreased in 53 (78%) of the waters. In 41 of them, Littorella had been replaced by submerged Juncus bulbosus L. and/or Sphagnum spp. These changes seem to have been caused by changed inorganic carbon budgets as a consequence of acidification. In the remaining 12 waters, eutrophication of the water and/or sediment seems to be responsible for the changes in the plant communities. Enrichment with phosphate of the mineral sediment alone, leads to luxurious growth of submerged, rooted macrophyte species such as Myriophyllum alterniflorum DC and Ranunculus peltatus Schrank, whereas phosphate-enrichment of both sediment and water leads to luxurious growth of pleustophytes such as Riccia fluitans L. and Lemna minor L. in small, shallow waters, and to plankton bloom and luxurious growth of epiphytes in larger, deeper waters. In these cases light limitation seems to be responsible for the disappearance or decline of the Littorellion species. 41 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.}
journal = {Aquat. Bot.; (Netherlands)}
volume = {17}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1983}
month = {Jan}
}