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Northern Ireland gas industry

Journal Article:

Abstract

Throughout Northern Ireland the production of town gas is derived from hydrocarbon feedstocks. In the larger undertakings in Northern Ireland the feedstock is light distillate; a light petroleum feedstock which is a crude gasoline comprised mainly of pentanes, reformed in catalytic plants. The remaining gas undertakings produce a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)/air mixture using a mixture of either butane or propane and air. The individual gas units and the type of reforming feedstock are shown. A review of the oil-dependence of town gas and electricity production in Northern Ireland has been considered and is mainly responsible for the high fuel prices experienced in the community. A detailed description of the reforming process has been described, and considerable efforts have been made to optimize the process. In spite of substantial economic savings being made on the processing unit, the gas industry is very susceptible to the changes in oil prices which have escalated rapidly in recent years. The difference in gas prices between the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland indicates that North Sea gas would offer major economic benefits to the gas industry in Northern Ireland, which is operating at a substantial loss at the moment. The industrial concerns, which are  More>>
Authors:
Anderson, R S; [1]  Asquith, R S; Brown, J M; McKay, G
  1. Belfast City Council Gas Dept.
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
ERA-03-016758; EDB-78-035497
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy World; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 39
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY; UNITED KINGDOM; CHARGES; FUEL CONSUMPTION; LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GASES; NATURAL GAS; NORTH SEA; PRODUCTION; TOWN GAS; ATLANTIC OCEAN; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENERGY SOURCES; EUROPE; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GASES; INDUSTRY; INTERMEDIATE BTU GAS; NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS; 030600* - Natural Gas- Economic, Industrial, & Business Aspects
OSTI ID:
5360734
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: EGYWA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 16-18
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Anderson, R S, Asquith, R S, Brown, J M, and McKay, G. Northern Ireland gas industry. United Kingdom: N. p., 1977. Web.
Anderson, R S, Asquith, R S, Brown, J M, & McKay, G. Northern Ireland gas industry. United Kingdom.
Anderson, R S, Asquith, R S, Brown, J M, and McKay, G. 1977. "Northern Ireland gas industry." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_5360734,
title = {Northern Ireland gas industry}
author = {Anderson, R S, Asquith, R S, Brown, J M, and McKay, G}
abstractNote = {Throughout Northern Ireland the production of town gas is derived from hydrocarbon feedstocks. In the larger undertakings in Northern Ireland the feedstock is light distillate; a light petroleum feedstock which is a crude gasoline comprised mainly of pentanes, reformed in catalytic plants. The remaining gas undertakings produce a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)/air mixture using a mixture of either butane or propane and air. The individual gas units and the type of reforming feedstock are shown. A review of the oil-dependence of town gas and electricity production in Northern Ireland has been considered and is mainly responsible for the high fuel prices experienced in the community. A detailed description of the reforming process has been described, and considerable efforts have been made to optimize the process. In spite of substantial economic savings being made on the processing unit, the gas industry is very susceptible to the changes in oil prices which have escalated rapidly in recent years. The difference in gas prices between the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland indicates that North Sea gas would offer major economic benefits to the gas industry in Northern Ireland, which is operating at a substantial loss at the moment. The industrial concerns, which are dependent on gas and therefore paying high fuel costs, suffer in competition with outside companies. The injection of a moderately cheap natural gas supply to the community may encourage industrial expansion and provide work in a high unemployment area. Although substantial costs must be incurred in distribution pipelines and burner conversions if Northern Ireland changes to natural gas, there appears to be a strong case to introduce North Sea gas in the near future.}
journal = {Energy World; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {39}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1977}
month = {Jul}
}