You need JavaScript to view this

When and how should we teach the basic concepts of radiation beam dosage

Journal Article:

Abstract

The difficulty that many trainees, including those medically qualified, have in achieving a sound working grasp of certain basic principles of radiation beam dosage is often underestimated. Since any failure of understanding may seriously impair the efficiency of the team treating the patient, the discussion of these problems (and especially the monitoring of the results of such discussion by means of oral and written tests) deserves a high priority. Contrary to traditional practice, there would seem to be no good reason why teaching of radiation beam dosage, and the effect on dose-rate of changes in the treatment distance or in the amount of scattered radiation, should not begin in the very first week of training and be immediately integrated with discussion of the dose-rate information available at every radiotherapy unit when the patient is treated. A preliminary course of physics lectures does not usually make the understanding of these principles any easier and can be done either concurrently or later. For many radiotherapy trainees and for many doctors in other fields, comparison with drug dosage and with the brightness and scatter of ordinary light beams, avoiding technical terms so far as possible, may achieve a better initial understanding of basic  More>>
Authors:
Brewin, T B [1] 
  1. Institute of Radiotherapeutics and Oncology, Glasgow (UK)
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-08-330631; EDB-78-028582
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Br. J. Radiol.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 50:594
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; EDUCATION; RADIOLOGICAL PERSONNEL; RADIOTHERAPY; PLANNING; BEAMS; DOSE RATES; LEARNING; PERFORMANCE TESTING; RADIATION DOSES; SCATTERING; DOSES; MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; PERSONNEL; RADIOLOGY; TESTING; THERAPY; 560151* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man; 655003 - Medical Physics- Dosimetry
OSTI ID:
5332110
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: BJRAA
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
Pages: 430-434
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Brewin, T B. When and how should we teach the basic concepts of radiation beam dosage. United Kingdom: N. p., 1977. Web.
Brewin, T B. When and how should we teach the basic concepts of radiation beam dosage. United Kingdom.
Brewin, T B. 1977. "When and how should we teach the basic concepts of radiation beam dosage." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_5332110,
title = {When and how should we teach the basic concepts of radiation beam dosage}
author = {Brewin, T B}
abstractNote = {The difficulty that many trainees, including those medically qualified, have in achieving a sound working grasp of certain basic principles of radiation beam dosage is often underestimated. Since any failure of understanding may seriously impair the efficiency of the team treating the patient, the discussion of these problems (and especially the monitoring of the results of such discussion by means of oral and written tests) deserves a high priority. Contrary to traditional practice, there would seem to be no good reason why teaching of radiation beam dosage, and the effect on dose-rate of changes in the treatment distance or in the amount of scattered radiation, should not begin in the very first week of training and be immediately integrated with discussion of the dose-rate information available at every radiotherapy unit when the patient is treated. A preliminary course of physics lectures does not usually make the understanding of these principles any easier and can be done either concurrently or later. For many radiotherapy trainees and for many doctors in other fields, comparison with drug dosage and with the brightness and scatter of ordinary light beams, avoiding technical terms so far as possible, may achieve a better initial understanding of basic principles than is achieved by mathematical equations and theoretical physics.}
journal = {Br. J. Radiol.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {50:594}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1977}
month = {Jun}
}