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Drinking water and health hazards in environmental perspective

Abstract

Among the present environmental issues drinking water quality and more specifically organic micropollutants receive not the highest priority. The long tradition of potable water quality assurance and the sophisticated evaluation methodologies provide a very useful approach which has great potential for wider application in environmental research and policy making. Water consumption patterns and the relative importance of the drinking water exposure route show that inorganic water contaminants generally contribute much more to the total daily intake than organic micropollutants. An exception is chloroform and probably the group of typical chlorination by-products. Among the carcinogenic organic pollutants in drinking water only chlorination by-products may potentially increase the health risk. Treatment should therefore be designed to reduce chemical oxidant application as much as possible. It is expected that in the beginning of next century organic micropollutants will receive much less attention and that the present focus on treatment by-products will shift to distribution problems. Within the total context of water quality monitoring microbiological tests will grow in relative importance and might once again dominate chemical analysis the next century. As disinfection is the central issue of the present water treatment practice the search for the ideal disinfection procedure will continue and might  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1985
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-86-168552
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Sci. Total Environ.; (Netherlands)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; DRINKING WATER; HEALTH HAZARDS; WATER TREATMENT; CARCINOGENS; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE; WATER QUALITY; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; HAZARDS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INDUSTRY; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; WATER; 520200* - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 560306 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
5328453
Research Organizations:
National Institute for Public Health and Environmental Hygiene, Bilthoven, The Netherlands
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: STEVA
Submitting Site:
NLM
Size:
Pages: 487-503
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Zoeteman, B C. Drinking water and health hazards in environmental perspective. Netherlands: N. p., 1985. Web. doi:10.1016/0048-9697(85)90353-5.
Zoeteman, B C. Drinking water and health hazards in environmental perspective. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/0048-9697(85)90353-5.
Zoeteman, B C. 1985. "Drinking water and health hazards in environmental perspective." Netherlands. doi:10.1016/0048-9697(85)90353-5. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0048-9697(85)90353-5.
@misc{etde_5328453,
title = {Drinking water and health hazards in environmental perspective}
author = {Zoeteman, B C}
abstractNote = {Among the present environmental issues drinking water quality and more specifically organic micropollutants receive not the highest priority. The long tradition of potable water quality assurance and the sophisticated evaluation methodologies provide a very useful approach which has great potential for wider application in environmental research and policy making. Water consumption patterns and the relative importance of the drinking water exposure route show that inorganic water contaminants generally contribute much more to the total daily intake than organic micropollutants. An exception is chloroform and probably the group of typical chlorination by-products. Among the carcinogenic organic pollutants in drinking water only chlorination by-products may potentially increase the health risk. Treatment should therefore be designed to reduce chemical oxidant application as much as possible. It is expected that in the beginning of next century organic micropollutants will receive much less attention and that the present focus on treatment by-products will shift to distribution problems. Within the total context of water quality monitoring microbiological tests will grow in relative importance and might once again dominate chemical analysis the next century. As disinfection is the central issue of the present water treatment practice the search for the ideal disinfection procedure will continue and might result in a further reduction in the use of chemical oxidants. 26 references.}
doi = {10.1016/0048-9697(85)90353-5}
journal = {Sci. Total Environ.; (Netherlands)}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1985}
month = {Dec}
}