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Cycling of acid and base cations in deciduous stands of Huntington Forest, New York, and Turkey Lakes, Ontario

Journal Article:

Abstract

Annual nutrient fluxes within two forests exposed to acidic deposition were compared for a 1-year period. Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) was the dominant cation in throughfall and soil solutions from tolerant hardwood dominated Spodosols (Podzols) at both Huntington Forest (HF), New York, and the Turkey Lakes watershed (TLW), Ontario. There was a net annual export of Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the TLW soil, whereas base cation inputs in precipitation equalled outputs at HF. In 1986, leaching losses of base cations were five times greater at TLW than at HF. A higher percentage of the base cation reserves was leached from the soil at TLW (5%) than at HF (1%). Relative to throughfall, aluminum concentrations increased in forest-floor and mineral-soil solutions, especially at HF. The TLW soil appears more sensitive to soil acidification. Deposited atmospheric acidity, however, was small in comparison with native soil acidity (total and exchangeable) and the reserves of base cations in each soil. Soil acidity and base saturation, therefore, are likely only to change slowly. 57 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.
Authors:
Foster, N W; Morrison, I K; [1]  Mitchell, M J; [2]  Shepard, J P [3] 
  1. Forestry Canada, Sault Ste. Marie, ON (Canada)
  2. State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (USA)
  3. National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (USA)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1992
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
CANM-92-002788; EDB-92-081837
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Canadian Journal of Forest Research; (Canada); Journal Volume: 22
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACID RAIN; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; FORESTS; SOIL CHEMISTRY; SOILS; ACIDIFICATION; CATIONS; LEACHING; NEW YORK; NUTRIENTS; ONTARIO; THROUGHFALL; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; CANADA; CHARGED PARTICLES; CHEMISTRY; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; DISSOLUTION; IONS; NORTH AMERICA; RAIN; SEPARATION PROCESSES; USA; 540220* - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)
OSTI ID:
5316648
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0045-5067; CODEN: CJFRA
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: 167-174
Announcement Date:
Jun 01, 1992

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Foster, N W, Morrison, I K, Mitchell, M J, and Shepard, J P. Cycling of acid and base cations in deciduous stands of Huntington Forest, New York, and Turkey Lakes, Ontario. Canada: N. p., 1992. Web.
Foster, N W, Morrison, I K, Mitchell, M J, & Shepard, J P. Cycling of acid and base cations in deciduous stands of Huntington Forest, New York, and Turkey Lakes, Ontario. Canada.
Foster, N W, Morrison, I K, Mitchell, M J, and Shepard, J P. 1992. "Cycling of acid and base cations in deciduous stands of Huntington Forest, New York, and Turkey Lakes, Ontario." Canada.
@misc{etde_5316648,
title = {Cycling of acid and base cations in deciduous stands of Huntington Forest, New York, and Turkey Lakes, Ontario}
author = {Foster, N W, Morrison, I K, Mitchell, M J, and Shepard, J P}
abstractNote = {Annual nutrient fluxes within two forests exposed to acidic deposition were compared for a 1-year period. Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) was the dominant cation in throughfall and soil solutions from tolerant hardwood dominated Spodosols (Podzols) at both Huntington Forest (HF), New York, and the Turkey Lakes watershed (TLW), Ontario. There was a net annual export of Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the TLW soil, whereas base cation inputs in precipitation equalled outputs at HF. In 1986, leaching losses of base cations were five times greater at TLW than at HF. A higher percentage of the base cation reserves was leached from the soil at TLW (5%) than at HF (1%). Relative to throughfall, aluminum concentrations increased in forest-floor and mineral-soil solutions, especially at HF. The TLW soil appears more sensitive to soil acidification. Deposited atmospheric acidity, however, was small in comparison with native soil acidity (total and exchangeable) and the reserves of base cations in each soil. Soil acidity and base saturation, therefore, are likely only to change slowly. 57 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.}
journal = {Canadian Journal of Forest Research; (Canada)}
volume = {22}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1992}
month = {Jan}
}