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Manitoba Hazardous Waste Management Corporation system scope and technology study

Technical Report:

Abstract

The Manitoba Hazardous Waste Management Corporation is charged with the responsibility of implementing a hazardous waste management system in the province. A review was undertaken of the planning work performed to date and of the Corporation's development strategy. The evaluation was based on a review of the literature and on experience with hazardous waste planning, management, and engineering. To facilitate evaluation, the development strategies were visualized as made up of 3 logical components: the mechanisms or business vehicles used; the rates of development employed; and the geographical locations in which the activities take place. Based on ownership or funding source, 3 business development options were identified: public corporation, private enterprise, and joint venture. The only two options possible in terms of rate of development are incremental and immediate. Only 3 general locations were considered: in Manitoba, outside Manitoba, or a combination of both. Results showed that a joint venture is a good option since it offers a good tradeoff to minimize expenditures between public and private financing, and it enables combining the flexibility and freedom of action of a private corporation with the responsibility of a public corporation. The incremental approach provides more flexibility than immediate development and is the  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1988
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
RCP-61087-Pt.1; MICROLOG-89-02966
Reference Number:
CANM-89-003154; EDB-90-001456
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; MANITOBA; EVALUATION; FINANCING; OWNERSHIP; PUBLIC POLICY; CANADA; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; NORTH AMERICA; 290300* - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety
OSTI ID:
5315206
Research Organizations:
Reid Crowther and Partners Ltd., Winnipeg, MB (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
PC Manitoba Hazardous Waste Management Corporation, 226-530 Century Street, Winnipeg, MB, CAN R3H 0Y4; MF CANMET/TID, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, 555 Booth St., Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0G1.
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: (45 p)
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Not Available. Manitoba Hazardous Waste Management Corporation system scope and technology study. Canada: N. p., 1988. Web.
Not Available. Manitoba Hazardous Waste Management Corporation system scope and technology study. Canada.
Not Available. 1988. "Manitoba Hazardous Waste Management Corporation system scope and technology study." Canada.
@misc{etde_5315206,
title = {Manitoba Hazardous Waste Management Corporation system scope and technology study}
author = {Not Available}
abstractNote = {The Manitoba Hazardous Waste Management Corporation is charged with the responsibility of implementing a hazardous waste management system in the province. A review was undertaken of the planning work performed to date and of the Corporation's development strategy. The evaluation was based on a review of the literature and on experience with hazardous waste planning, management, and engineering. To facilitate evaluation, the development strategies were visualized as made up of 3 logical components: the mechanisms or business vehicles used; the rates of development employed; and the geographical locations in which the activities take place. Based on ownership or funding source, 3 business development options were identified: public corporation, private enterprise, and joint venture. The only two options possible in terms of rate of development are incremental and immediate. Only 3 general locations were considered: in Manitoba, outside Manitoba, or a combination of both. Results showed that a joint venture is a good option since it offers a good tradeoff to minimize expenditures between public and private financing, and it enables combining the flexibility and freedom of action of a private corporation with the responsibility of a public corporation. The incremental approach provides more flexibility than immediate development and is the most practical solution to the many uncertainties of the hazardous waste problem. This approach is nominally more costly because it takes longer and cannot capitalize on economies of scale, but it also minimizes the risk of making the wrong capital investment and is therefore a safer investment approach. 105 refs. 28 figs., 15 tabs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1988}
month = {Jan}
}