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Seasonal latitudinal and secular variations in temperature trend - evidence for influence of anthropogenic sulfate

Journal Article:

Abstract

Tropospheric aerosols increase the shortwave reflectivity of the Earth-atmosphere system both by scattering light directly, in the absence of clouds, and by enhancing cloud reflectivity. The radiative forcing of climate exerted by anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, derived mainly from SO[sub 2] emitted from fossil fuel combustion, is opposite that due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases and is estimated to be of comparable average magnitude in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. However, persuasive evidence of climate response to this forcing has thus far been lacking. Here we examine patterns of seasonal and latitudinal variations in temperature anomaly trend for evidence of such a response. Pronounced minima in the rate of temperature increase in summer months in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes are consistent with the latitudinal distribution of anthropogenic sulfate and changes in the rate of SO[sub 2] emissions over the industrial era.
Authors:
Hunter, D E; Schwartz, S E; Wagener, R; Benkovitz, C M [1] 
  1. University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Scripps Institute of Oceanography
Publication Date:
Nov 19, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
CLA-94-031431; EDB-94-047138
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geophysical Research Letters (American Geophysical Union); (United States); Journal Volume: 20:22
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; SULFATES; TROPOSPHERE; ACID RAIN; AEROSOLS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; SULFUR DIOXIDE; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; CHALCOGENIDES; COLLOIDS; DISPERSIONS; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; RAIN; SOLS; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; VARIATIONS; 540120* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)
OSTI ID:
5298842
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276; CODEN: GPRLAJ
Submitting Site:
CLA
Size:
Pages: 2455-2458
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Hunter, D E, Schwartz, S E, Wagener, R, and Benkovitz, C M. Seasonal latitudinal and secular variations in temperature trend - evidence for influence of anthropogenic sulfate. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Hunter, D E, Schwartz, S E, Wagener, R, & Benkovitz, C M. Seasonal latitudinal and secular variations in temperature trend - evidence for influence of anthropogenic sulfate. United States.
Hunter, D E, Schwartz, S E, Wagener, R, and Benkovitz, C M. 1993. "Seasonal latitudinal and secular variations in temperature trend - evidence for influence of anthropogenic sulfate." United States.
@misc{etde_5298842,
title = {Seasonal latitudinal and secular variations in temperature trend - evidence for influence of anthropogenic sulfate}
author = {Hunter, D E, Schwartz, S E, Wagener, R, and Benkovitz, C M}
abstractNote = {Tropospheric aerosols increase the shortwave reflectivity of the Earth-atmosphere system both by scattering light directly, in the absence of clouds, and by enhancing cloud reflectivity. The radiative forcing of climate exerted by anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, derived mainly from SO[sub 2] emitted from fossil fuel combustion, is opposite that due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases and is estimated to be of comparable average magnitude in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. However, persuasive evidence of climate response to this forcing has thus far been lacking. Here we examine patterns of seasonal and latitudinal variations in temperature anomaly trend for evidence of such a response. Pronounced minima in the rate of temperature increase in summer months in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes are consistent with the latitudinal distribution of anthropogenic sulfate and changes in the rate of SO[sub 2] emissions over the industrial era.}
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters (American Geophysical Union); (United States)}
volume = {20:22}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United States}
year = {1993}
month = {Nov}
}