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Metals and alloys for Arctic use

Technical Report:

Abstract

The northlands of Canada can be regarded as a vast, but not inexhaustible, storehouse of mineral, oil and gas reserves. At the same time, this area is a delicate ecology that can easily be irreversibly damaged. It is vitally important that industrial activity associated with these reserves should proceed with a maximum of safety and a minimum risk of pollution, with optimum utilization of materials. In order to facilitate these objectives, appropriate technical information is required on the characteristics of available engineering metals and alloys with respect to service in Arctic and sub-Arctic environments. The body of this monograph consists of data sheets on irons and steels, aluminum, magnesium, titanium, copper, lead, tin, nickel and zinc alloys. Background information is given on the general characteristics of the various alloy systems, their advantages and disadvantages, on typical engineering applications, and on potential problem areas. Human difficulties associated with low temperature will exert some measure of control over the available construction periods, and may influence the techniques and materials used. A second important factor is the general inaccessibility of the northern regions. The designer must pay attention to reliability, ease of maintenance and ease of transportation. A premium is placed on the  More>>
Authors:
Thurston, R C.A. [1] 
  1. ed.
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1976
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
CANMET-76-1; CE-03888
Reference Number:
CANM-91-009759; EDB-91-133611
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ARCTIC REGIONS; ALLOYS; METALS; CORROSION; FATIGUE; LOW TEMPERATURE; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; PHYSICAL METALLURGY; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ELEMENTS; METALLURGY; POLAR REGIONS; 360100* - Metals & Alloys
OSTI ID:
5282140
Research Organizations:
Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa, ON (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Technical Information Division, 562 Booth St., Room 20-C, Ottawa, ON, CAN K1A 0G1.
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: (234 p)
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Thurston, R C.A. Metals and alloys for Arctic use. Canada: N. p., 1976. Web.
Thurston, R C.A. Metals and alloys for Arctic use. Canada.
Thurston, R C.A. 1976. "Metals and alloys for Arctic use." Canada.
@misc{etde_5282140,
title = {Metals and alloys for Arctic use}
author = {Thurston, R C.A.}
abstractNote = {The northlands of Canada can be regarded as a vast, but not inexhaustible, storehouse of mineral, oil and gas reserves. At the same time, this area is a delicate ecology that can easily be irreversibly damaged. It is vitally important that industrial activity associated with these reserves should proceed with a maximum of safety and a minimum risk of pollution, with optimum utilization of materials. In order to facilitate these objectives, appropriate technical information is required on the characteristics of available engineering metals and alloys with respect to service in Arctic and sub-Arctic environments. The body of this monograph consists of data sheets on irons and steels, aluminum, magnesium, titanium, copper, lead, tin, nickel and zinc alloys. Background information is given on the general characteristics of the various alloy systems, their advantages and disadvantages, on typical engineering applications, and on potential problem areas. Human difficulties associated with low temperature will exert some measure of control over the available construction periods, and may influence the techniques and materials used. A second important factor is the general inaccessibility of the northern regions. The designer must pay attention to reliability, ease of maintenance and ease of transportation. A premium is placed on the lightness and compactness of equipment, and may emphasize low density or high strength materials. Easy installation and removal is advantageous, due to the temporary nature of many operations, and the limited local labor available. Pollution avoidance must be considered, and aspects such as scrap recovery value and rate of degradation are important. In cases with little recovery value, corrosion resistance may be a disadvantage rather than an advantage. 238 refs., 7 figs., 26 tabs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1976}
month = {Jan}
}