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Effects of atomic bomb radiations on human food

Journal Article:

Abstract

The increase in energy release of atomic weapons has increased the hazard of atomic radiation to food. Products of atomic explosions are probably similar regardless of size. Of the energy released, blast energy accounts for one-half, heat flash for one-third, initial nuclear radiation for one-twentieth, and residual radiation (potential fallout) about one-tenth. Radioactive elements may enter man by inhalation, by open wounds, or by ingestion of contaminated food. Food can become contaminated by direct fallout on unprotected food or through metabolic assimilation by plants or animals. Dust-proof containers and undamaged cans provide protection from the first hazard. Cans, etc. should be washed before opening. Other food could be cleaned and used if subsequent monitoring indicated that the fallout material had been removed.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1956
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-80-091245
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Can. J. Public Health; (Canada); Journal Volume: 47
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; FALLOUT; RADIATION PROTECTION; FOOD; CONTAMINATION; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; RADIATION HAZARDS; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE PATHWAY; FISSION PRODUCTS; INGESTION; INHALATION; PLANTS; RADIATION MONITORING; SKIN; BODY; EXPLOSIONS; HAZARDS; HEALTH HAZARDS; INTAKE; ISOTOPES; MONITORING; ORGANS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; 500300* - Environment, Atmospheric- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 510302 - Environment, Terrestrial- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport- Terrestrial Ecosystems & Food Chains- (-1987); 450200 - Military Technology, Weaponry, & National Defense- Nuclear Explosions & Explosives
OSTI ID:
5239403
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: CJPEA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 113-141
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Pace, F C. Effects of atomic bomb radiations on human food. Canada: N. p., 1956. Web.
Pace, F C. Effects of atomic bomb radiations on human food. Canada.
Pace, F C. 1956. "Effects of atomic bomb radiations on human food." Canada.
@misc{etde_5239403,
title = {Effects of atomic bomb radiations on human food}
author = {Pace, F C}
abstractNote = {The increase in energy release of atomic weapons has increased the hazard of atomic radiation to food. Products of atomic explosions are probably similar regardless of size. Of the energy released, blast energy accounts for one-half, heat flash for one-third, initial nuclear radiation for one-twentieth, and residual radiation (potential fallout) about one-tenth. Radioactive elements may enter man by inhalation, by open wounds, or by ingestion of contaminated food. Food can become contaminated by direct fallout on unprotected food or through metabolic assimilation by plants or animals. Dust-proof containers and undamaged cans provide protection from the first hazard. Cans, etc. should be washed before opening. Other food could be cleaned and used if subsequent monitoring indicated that the fallout material had been removed.}
journal = {Can. J. Public Health; (Canada)}
volume = {47}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1956}
month = {Jan}
}