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Shale oil. II. Gases from oil shale

Journal Article:

Abstract

Oil shale (from Colorado) was pyrolyzed, and the gaseous products obtained were studied. The organic material present in oil shale contains carboxyl groups that lose carbon dioxide during pyrolysis before the formation of soluble bitumen. Nitrogen was evolved as ammonia in two stages and was not continuous. The first evolution was from loosely combined nitrogen structures, whereas the second was from more stable forms. No hydrocarbons were present as such in the kerogen. The gaseous products from oil-shale pyrolysis were similar to those obtained by distillation of colophony, amber, coal, and wood. This places the kerogen of the oil shale in the same series of carbonaceous substances as those from which coals are formed. Kerogen appeared to be decomposed in three steps; namely, to insoluble bitumen, to soluble bitumen, and to oil (gas evolution accompanied each step). Its low solubility and the character of its pyrolytic gas indicated that kerogen is largely a resinous residue from vegetation of the past era and may have been formed by the tranportation of coal-forming organic debris to inland salty lakes or carried to the sea by clay-laden waters. The salt water and the natural settling action precipitated the clay and organic matter in  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1927
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-78-058985
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oil Bull.; (Canada); Journal Volume: 13
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; COLORADO; OIL SHALES; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; AMMONIA; BITUMENS; DECOMPOSITION; GASES; KEROGEN; PYROLYSIS; REMOVAL; BITUMINOUS MATERIALS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; HYDRIDES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN HYDRIDES; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; TAR; USA; 040500* - Oil Shales & Tar Sands- Properties & Composition
OSTI ID:
5220321
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: OILBA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 489-493, 729-737, 837-843
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

McKee, R H, and Manning, P D.V. Shale oil. II. Gases from oil shale. Canada: N. p., 1927. Web.
McKee, R H, & Manning, P D.V. Shale oil. II. Gases from oil shale. Canada.
McKee, R H, and Manning, P D.V. 1927. "Shale oil. II. Gases from oil shale." Canada.
@misc{etde_5220321,
title = {Shale oil. II. Gases from oil shale}
author = {McKee, R H, and Manning, P D.V.}
abstractNote = {Oil shale (from Colorado) was pyrolyzed, and the gaseous products obtained were studied. The organic material present in oil shale contains carboxyl groups that lose carbon dioxide during pyrolysis before the formation of soluble bitumen. Nitrogen was evolved as ammonia in two stages and was not continuous. The first evolution was from loosely combined nitrogen structures, whereas the second was from more stable forms. No hydrocarbons were present as such in the kerogen. The gaseous products from oil-shale pyrolysis were similar to those obtained by distillation of colophony, amber, coal, and wood. This places the kerogen of the oil shale in the same series of carbonaceous substances as those from which coals are formed. Kerogen appeared to be decomposed in three steps; namely, to insoluble bitumen, to soluble bitumen, and to oil (gas evolution accompanied each step). Its low solubility and the character of its pyrolytic gas indicated that kerogen is largely a resinous residue from vegetation of the past era and may have been formed by the tranportation of coal-forming organic debris to inland salty lakes or carried to the sea by clay-laden waters. The salt water and the natural settling action precipitated the clay and organic matter in an almost homogeneous deposit. Oil shales have existed to the present time because they have not been subjected to high pressures or elevated temperatures that would have changed them to petroleum.}
journal = {Oil Bull.; (Canada)}
volume = {13}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1927}
month = {Jan}
}