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Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system

Abstract

Over the last year, Westinghouse engineers and operators from the Beznau nuclear power station (KKB), owned by the Nordostschweizerische Krafwerke AG of Baden, Switzerland, have been installing and testing the Westinghouse AWARE Alarm Management System in Beznau/SNUPPS operator training simulator, owned and operated by the Westinghouse Electric Corp., in Waltz Mill, PA, USA. The testing has focused primarily on validating the trigger logic data base and on familiarizing the utility`s training department with the operation of the system in a real-time environment. Some of the tests have included plant process scenarios in which the computerized Emergency Procedures were available and used through the COMPRO (COMputerized PROcedures) System in conjunction with the AWARE System. While the results to date are qualitative from the perspective of system performance and improvement in message presentation, the tests have generally confirmed the expectations of the design. There is a large reduction in the number of messages that the control room staff must deal with during major process abnormalities, yet at times of relative minor disturbances, some additional messages are available which add clarification, e.g., ``Pump Trouble`` messages. The ``flow`` of an abnormality as it progresses from one part of the plant`s processes to another is  More>>
Authors:
Carrera, J P; Easter, J R; Roth, E M [1] 
  1. Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1997
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-IWG-NPPCI-97/1; CONF-9609391-; COG-97-47-I; AECL-11772.
Reference Number:
SCA: 220400; 210000; PA: AIX-28:059522; EDB-97:116760; SN: 97001844487
Resource Relation:
Conference: IAEA specialists` meeting on experience and improvements in advanced alarm annunciation systems in nuclear power plants, Chalk River (Canada), 17-19 Sep 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Experience and improvements in advanced alarm annunciation systems in nuclear power plants. Proceedings; PB: 355 p.
Subject:
22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; ALARM SYSTEMS; SIMULATORS; TESTING; BEZNAU-1 REACTOR; BEZNAU-2 REACTOR; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; SAFETY ENGINEERING
OSTI ID:
519637
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE97640102; TRN: XA9744366059522
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE97640102
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 212-216
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Carrera, J P, Easter, J R, and Roth, E M. Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system. IAEA: N. p., 1997. Web.
Carrera, J P, Easter, J R, & Roth, E M. Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system. IAEA.
Carrera, J P, Easter, J R, and Roth, E M. 1997. "Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system." IAEA.
@misc{etde_519637,
title = {Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system}
author = {Carrera, J P, Easter, J R, and Roth, E M}
abstractNote = {Over the last year, Westinghouse engineers and operators from the Beznau nuclear power station (KKB), owned by the Nordostschweizerische Krafwerke AG of Baden, Switzerland, have been installing and testing the Westinghouse AWARE Alarm Management System in Beznau/SNUPPS operator training simulator, owned and operated by the Westinghouse Electric Corp., in Waltz Mill, PA, USA. The testing has focused primarily on validating the trigger logic data base and on familiarizing the utility`s training department with the operation of the system in a real-time environment. Some of the tests have included plant process scenarios in which the computerized Emergency Procedures were available and used through the COMPRO (COMputerized PROcedures) System in conjunction with the AWARE System. While the results to date are qualitative from the perspective of system performance and improvement in message presentation, the tests have generally confirmed the expectations of the design. There is a large reduction in the number of messages that the control room staff must deal with during major process abnormalities, yet at times of relative minor disturbances, some additional messages are available which add clarification, e.g., ``Pump Trouble`` messages. The ``flow`` of an abnormality as it progresses from one part of the plant`s processes to another is quite visible. Timing of the messages and the lack of message avalanching is proving to give the operators additional time to respond to messages. Generally, the anxiety level to ``do something`` immediately upon a reactor trip appears to be reduced. (author). 8 refs.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1997}
month = {Sep}
}