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Aerosols, clouds and radiation

Abstract

Most of the so-called 'CO{sub 2} effect' is, in fact, an 'H{sub 2}O effect' brought into play by the climate modeler's assumption that planetary average temperature dictates water-vapor concentration (following Clapeyron-Clausius). That assumption ignores the removal process, which cloud physicists know to be influenced by the aerosol, since the latter primarily controls cloud droplet number and size. Droplet number and size are also influential for shortwave (solar) energy. The reflectance of many thin to moderately thick clouds changes when nuclei concentrations change and make shortwave albedo susceptible to aerosol influence.
Authors:
Twomey, S [1] 
  1. University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (USA). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1991
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-8910546-
Reference Number:
CLA-91-110043; EDB-91-147683
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Environment; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 25A:11; Conference: Symposium on global climatic effects of aerosols, Reno-Sparks, U (United States), 11-13 Oct 1989
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CLOUDS; AEROSOLS; ALBEDO; CONDENSATION NUCLEI; DROPLETS; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; SOLAR RADIATION; WATER VAPOR; CLIMATIC CHANGE; COLLOIDS; DISPERSIONS; FLUIDS; GASES; PARTICLES; RADIATIONS; SOLS; STELLAR RADIATION; VAPORS; 540110*
OSTI ID:
5195944
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0004-6981; CODEN: ATENB
Submitting Site:
CLA
Size:
Pages: 2435-2442
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Twomey, S. Aerosols, clouds and radiation. United Kingdom: N. p., 1991. Web.
Twomey, S. Aerosols, clouds and radiation. United Kingdom.
Twomey, S. 1991. "Aerosols, clouds and radiation." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_5195944,
title = {Aerosols, clouds and radiation}
author = {Twomey, S}
abstractNote = {Most of the so-called 'CO{sub 2} effect' is, in fact, an 'H{sub 2}O effect' brought into play by the climate modeler's assumption that planetary average temperature dictates water-vapor concentration (following Clapeyron-Clausius). That assumption ignores the removal process, which cloud physicists know to be influenced by the aerosol, since the latter primarily controls cloud droplet number and size. Droplet number and size are also influential for shortwave (solar) energy. The reflectance of many thin to moderately thick clouds changes when nuclei concentrations change and make shortwave albedo susceptible to aerosol influence.}
journal = {Atmospheric Environment; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {25A:11}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1991}
month = {Jan}
}