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Experimental investigation into the surface oxidation of lignite high temperature coke

Journal Article:

Abstract

It was intended to produce lignite high temperature coke (BHFK) in the laboratory comparable to that produced with the Salem-Lurgi-open hearth process and quench them according to the prescribed condition. By this means, the surface oxide formation could be continually recorded gravimetrically. The self-sustaining reaction of the physical and chemical adsorption on the loose material were observed under consideration that the adsorption or surface oxide can exist in a gaseous as well as in a liquid aggregate. The established steam isotherms and electron-microscope photos identified the product BFHK as a material which shows in the range of high-humidity capillary condensation. The continuous gravimetric adsorption leads to 1,9 per cent by weight on dry surface oxides. On the other hand, oxidized coke in the presence of water builds up on the surface to 2,3 per cent by weight. It became apparent that the finest capillary water is not involved in the formation of the oxide. For the dry accumulation, which is a reaction of the first degree, the equation for the accumulation of the oxygen is given. From the BET surface, made up from the graphite-like ring structure of the carbon surface, as well as the dposited quantity of oxide, the  More>>
Authors:
Schaefer, H G; Dallmann, W [1] 
  1. Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany, F.R.). Lehrgebiet Kokerei und Brikettierung
Publication Date:
Nov 01, 1979
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-80-104460
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Braunkohle; (Germany, Federal Republic of); Journal Volume: 31:11
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COKE; OXIDATION; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; SURFACE PROPERTIES; ADSORPTION; BROWN COAL; CALCULATION METHODS; CHEMISORPTION; DRYING; QUENCHING; VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; COAL; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SORPTION; 010600* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Properties & Composition; 010401 - Coal & Coal Products- Carbonization- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
5174859
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
German
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: BRUKA
Submitting Site:
DE
Size:
Pages: 334-350
Announcement Date:
Sep 01, 1980

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Schaefer, H G, and Dallmann, W. Experimental investigation into the surface oxidation of lignite high temperature coke. Germany: N. p., 1979. Web.
Schaefer, H G, & Dallmann, W. Experimental investigation into the surface oxidation of lignite high temperature coke. Germany.
Schaefer, H G, and Dallmann, W. 1979. "Experimental investigation into the surface oxidation of lignite high temperature coke." Germany.
@misc{etde_5174859,
title = {Experimental investigation into the surface oxidation of lignite high temperature coke}
author = {Schaefer, H G, and Dallmann, W}
abstractNote = {It was intended to produce lignite high temperature coke (BHFK) in the laboratory comparable to that produced with the Salem-Lurgi-open hearth process and quench them according to the prescribed condition. By this means, the surface oxide formation could be continually recorded gravimetrically. The self-sustaining reaction of the physical and chemical adsorption on the loose material were observed under consideration that the adsorption or surface oxide can exist in a gaseous as well as in a liquid aggregate. The established steam isotherms and electron-microscope photos identified the product BFHK as a material which shows in the range of high-humidity capillary condensation. The continuous gravimetric adsorption leads to 1,9 per cent by weight on dry surface oxides. On the other hand, oxidized coke in the presence of water builds up on the surface to 2,3 per cent by weight. It became apparent that the finest capillary water is not involved in the formation of the oxide. For the dry accumulation, which is a reaction of the first degree, the equation for the accumulation of the oxygen is given. From the BET surface, made up from the graphite-like ring structure of the carbon surface, as well as the dposited quantity of oxide, the surface density of the oxygen atoms is indicated in relation to the quantity of carbon atoms, or alternatively the six-ring. The dry deposition leads to a proportion of 1,5 oxygen atoms to 10 carbon atoms. In a wet reaction, the ratio is 1,8 to 10. With increasing quantities of oxide, the content of volatile matter, the sparking point and reactivity increase, while the porosity diminishes as a consequence.}
journal = {Braunkohle; (Germany, Federal Republic of)}
volume = {31:11}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Germany}
year = {1979}
month = {Nov}
}