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Uranium enrichment: technology, economics, capacity

Abstract

Large-scale enrichment of uranium has now been carried out for 40 years. While the gaseous diffusion process was the original choice of several countries and continues today to provide the major component of the world production of separative work, the last two decades have witnessed the development of a number of alternative processes for enrichment. These processes, which are being studied and deployed around the world, offer a wide range of technical and economic characteristics which will be useful in assuring adequate capacity to meet projected reactor fuel market needs through the rest of this century at competitive prices. With present uncertainties in future enriched uranium needs, it is apparent that flexibility in the deployment and operation of any enrichment process will be one of the prime considerations for the future. More economical production of separative work not only can have a beneficial impact on reactor fuel costs, but also tends to conserve natural uranium resources. This paper reviews the world scene in the enrichment component of the fuel cycle, including existing or planned commercial-scale facilities and announced R and D efforts on various processes.
Publication Date:
Aug 01, 1982
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-CN-42/422; CONF-820914-2
Reference Number:
ERA-07-052849; EDB-82-138386
Resource Relation:
Conference: International conference on nuclear power experience, Vienna, Austria, 13 Sep 1982
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENRICHED URANIUM; PRODUCTION; ISOTOPE SEPARATION; REVIEWS; URANIUM ISOTOPES; CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT PLANTS; ECONOMICS; GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS; RELIABILITY; SAFETY; ACTINIDE ISOTOPES; ACTINIDES; DOCUMENT TYPES; ELEMENTS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; ISOTOPE ENRICHED MATERIALS; ISOTOPE SEPARATION PLANTS; ISOTOPES; MATERIALS; METALS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; SEPARATION PROCESSES; URANIUM; 050500* - Nuclear Fuels- Uranium Enrichment; 290600 - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy
Sponsoring Organizations:
USDOE
OSTI ID:
5170427
Research Organizations:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Department of Energy, Washington, DC (USA)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-26
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE82017068; TRN: 82-018202
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
Pages: 21
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Voigt, Jr., W. R., Vanstrum, P. R., Saire, D. E., Gestson, D. K., and Peske, S. E. Uranium enrichment: technology, economics, capacity. IAEA: N. p., 1982. Web.
Voigt, Jr., W. R., Vanstrum, P. R., Saire, D. E., Gestson, D. K., & Peske, S. E. Uranium enrichment: technology, economics, capacity. IAEA.
Voigt, Jr., W. R., Vanstrum, P. R., Saire, D. E., Gestson, D. K., and Peske, S. E. 1982. "Uranium enrichment: technology, economics, capacity." IAEA.
@misc{etde_5170427,
title = {Uranium enrichment: technology, economics, capacity}
author = {Voigt, Jr., W. R., Vanstrum, P. R., Saire, D. E., Gestson, D. K., and Peske, S. E.}
abstractNote = {Large-scale enrichment of uranium has now been carried out for 40 years. While the gaseous diffusion process was the original choice of several countries and continues today to provide the major component of the world production of separative work, the last two decades have witnessed the development of a number of alternative processes for enrichment. These processes, which are being studied and deployed around the world, offer a wide range of technical and economic characteristics which will be useful in assuring adequate capacity to meet projected reactor fuel market needs through the rest of this century at competitive prices. With present uncertainties in future enriched uranium needs, it is apparent that flexibility in the deployment and operation of any enrichment process will be one of the prime considerations for the future. More economical production of separative work not only can have a beneficial impact on reactor fuel costs, but also tends to conserve natural uranium resources. This paper reviews the world scene in the enrichment component of the fuel cycle, including existing or planned commercial-scale facilities and announced R and D efforts on various processes.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1982}
month = {Aug}
}