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Epidemiology of urinary tract infections in Hiroshima

Technical Report:

Abstract

The present study was conducted at ABCC on a sample of Hiroshima residents systematically seleced for determining the influence on general health status of exposure to the atomic bomb of 1945. A survey for urinary infections was taken on persons in the sample examined in the ABCC clinic over a 1-year period: approximately 3000 women and 2000 men. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of urinary infection and to study the relation between bacteriuria and various aspects of the general examination, particularly blood pressure. In addition, the rates of urinary tract infection in the clinic were compared with the rates of chronic pyelonephritis at autopsy. Results showed that infections were much more common in women than in men and rose with age in both sexes. The greatest increase in the prevalence was found in women age 60 years and over was due to coliform bacteria in all but a few instances. There was no difference in hematuria, glycosuria, diabetes, serum cholesterol, blood groups, electrocardiograms, audiometry, vibrometry, hemoglobin levels or height-weight ratios. Blood pressure is higher in infected women as compared with noninfected women and the finding of higher rates for cardiac enlargement suggests that this small  More>>
Publication Date:
Aug 19, 1964
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
ABCC-21-64
Reference Number:
EDB-84-058013
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; A-BOMB SURVIVORS; UROGENITAL SYSTEM DISEASES; EPIDEMIOLOGY; BACTERIAL DISEASES; BLOOD PRESSURE; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; HIROSHIMA; SEX DEPENDENCE; SYMPTOMS; ASIA; DISEASES; HUMAN POPULATIONS; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; JAPAN; POPULATIONS; 560151* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man; 560161 - Radionuclide Effects, Kinetics, & Toxicology- Man
OSTI ID:
5146303
Research Organizations:
Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, Hiroshima (Japan)
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
Japanese and English
Contract Number:
AC01-76EV03081
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE84008458
Availability:
NTIS, PC A03/MF A01.
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 31
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Freedman, L R, Phair, J P, Seki, Masafumi, Hamilton, H B, and Nefzger, M D. Epidemiology of urinary tract infections in Hiroshima. Japan: N. p., 1964. Web.
Freedman, L R, Phair, J P, Seki, Masafumi, Hamilton, H B, & Nefzger, M D. Epidemiology of urinary tract infections in Hiroshima. Japan.
Freedman, L R, Phair, J P, Seki, Masafumi, Hamilton, H B, and Nefzger, M D. 1964. "Epidemiology of urinary tract infections in Hiroshima." Japan.
@misc{etde_5146303,
title = {Epidemiology of urinary tract infections in Hiroshima}
author = {Freedman, L R, Phair, J P, Seki, Masafumi, Hamilton, H B, and Nefzger, M D}
abstractNote = {The present study was conducted at ABCC on a sample of Hiroshima residents systematically seleced for determining the influence on general health status of exposure to the atomic bomb of 1945. A survey for urinary infections was taken on persons in the sample examined in the ABCC clinic over a 1-year period: approximately 3000 women and 2000 men. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of urinary infection and to study the relation between bacteriuria and various aspects of the general examination, particularly blood pressure. In addition, the rates of urinary tract infection in the clinic were compared with the rates of chronic pyelonephritis at autopsy. Results showed that infections were much more common in women than in men and rose with age in both sexes. The greatest increase in the prevalence was found in women age 60 years and over was due to coliform bacteria in all but a few instances. There was no difference in hematuria, glycosuria, diabetes, serum cholesterol, blood groups, electrocardiograms, audiometry, vibrometry, hemoglobin levels or height-weight ratios. Blood pressure is higher in infected women as compared with noninfected women and the finding of higher rates for cardiac enlargement suggests that this small difference in blood pressures may have biological significance. However, the data do not permit a conclusion as to whether the urinary infections were responsible for the higher blood pressure levels, or whether the higher blood pressure levels increased the frequency of detectable infection. The difference between the clinical rates of urinary infection in men and women, and the pathological diagnosis of pyelonephritis in the same population, supports a previous suggestion that much of what is called pyelonephritis at autopsy is not due to urinary tract infection. 27 references, 2 figures, 10 tables.}
place = {Japan}
year = {1964}
month = {Aug}
}