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Does mercury vapor exposure increase urinary selenium excretion

Journal Article:

Abstract

It has been reported that an increase of urinary selenium excretion may occur as a result of mercury vapor exposure. However, experimental data regarding the interaction between mercury vapor and selenium have yielded ambiguous results about the retention and elimination of selenium due to mercury vapor exposure and the decrease of selenium excretion due to mercury in the form of mercuric mercury (Hg/sup 2 +/). In this study, the authors measured urinary mercury and selenium in workers with or without exposure to mercury vapor to determine whether or not urinary selenium excretion was increased as a result of mercury vapor exposure. Urine samples were collected from 141 workers, 71 men and 70 women, whose extent of exposure to mercury vapor varied according to their job sites. Workers were divided into five groups according to their urinary mercury levels. The mercury level in group I was less than 2.8 nmol/mmol creatinine which means that this group was mostly free from mercury exposure. The average age was almost identical among the groups. For both sexes, group V (with the highest urinary mercury level) had the lowest urinary selenium level, but one-way variance analysis (ANOVA) did not reveal any significant variations of urinary  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1985
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-178302
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ind. Health (Kawasaki); (Japan); Journal Volume: 23:2
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; MERCURY; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; SELENIUM; EXCRETION; RETENTION; PERSONNEL; SEX DEPENDENCE; SYNERGISM; URINE; VAPORS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BIOLOGICAL WASTES; BODY FLUIDS; CLEARANCE; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; GASES; MATERIALS; METALS; SEMIMETALS; WASTES; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
5118799
Research Organizations:
Univ. of Tokyo, Japan
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: INHEA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 163-165
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Hongo, T, Suzuki, T, Himeno, S, Watanabe, C, Satoh, H, and Shimada, Y. Does mercury vapor exposure increase urinary selenium excretion. Japan: N. p., 1985. Web. doi:10.2486/indhealth.23.163.
Hongo, T, Suzuki, T, Himeno, S, Watanabe, C, Satoh, H, & Shimada, Y. Does mercury vapor exposure increase urinary selenium excretion. Japan. doi:10.2486/indhealth.23.163.
Hongo, T, Suzuki, T, Himeno, S, Watanabe, C, Satoh, H, and Shimada, Y. 1985. "Does mercury vapor exposure increase urinary selenium excretion." Japan. doi:10.2486/indhealth.23.163. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.2486/indhealth.23.163.
@misc{etde_5118799,
title = {Does mercury vapor exposure increase urinary selenium excretion}
author = {Hongo, T, Suzuki, T, Himeno, S, Watanabe, C, Satoh, H, and Shimada, Y}
abstractNote = {It has been reported that an increase of urinary selenium excretion may occur as a result of mercury vapor exposure. However, experimental data regarding the interaction between mercury vapor and selenium have yielded ambiguous results about the retention and elimination of selenium due to mercury vapor exposure and the decrease of selenium excretion due to mercury in the form of mercuric mercury (Hg/sup 2 +/). In this study, the authors measured urinary mercury and selenium in workers with or without exposure to mercury vapor to determine whether or not urinary selenium excretion was increased as a result of mercury vapor exposure. Urine samples were collected from 141 workers, 71 men and 70 women, whose extent of exposure to mercury vapor varied according to their job sites. Workers were divided into five groups according to their urinary mercury levels. The mercury level in group I was less than 2.8 nmol/mmol creatinine which means that this group was mostly free from mercury exposure. The average age was almost identical among the groups. For both sexes, group V (with the highest urinary mercury level) had the lowest urinary selenium level, but one-way variance analysis (ANOVA) did not reveal any significant variations of urinary selenium with urinary mercury levels; however, a weak but significant negative correlation between mercury and selenium was found in men.}
doi = {10.2486/indhealth.23.163}
journal = {Ind. Health (Kawasaki); (Japan)}
volume = {23:2}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1985}
month = {Jan}
}