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Developing countries and the frontiers of science and technology

Journal Article:

Abstract

Direct transfers of technology to developing countries are basically product transfers which may be irrelevant to the recipient country's needs. The process of imitation, however, can build upon local research aided by information transfers so that innovative technology is applied more appropriately. Since developing countries think of technology transfer as a purchased package rather than an intellectual process, most Third World countries have a low innovative capacity at present. This can be overcome if the developed countries will cooperate with information transfers. 24 references. (DCK)
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 1980
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EPA-06-005091; EDB-80-110978
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Sci. Public Policy; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 7:3
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY; INFORMATION; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; 290500* - Energy Planning & Policy- Research, Development, Demonstration, & Commercialization
OSTI ID:
5108908
Research Organizations:
Universidad de Los Andes, Merida, Venezuela
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: SPPLB
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 207-214
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Gunawardena, W. Developing countries and the frontiers of science and technology. United Kingdom: N. p., 1980. Web.
Gunawardena, W. Developing countries and the frontiers of science and technology. United Kingdom.
Gunawardena, W. 1980. "Developing countries and the frontiers of science and technology." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_5108908,
title = {Developing countries and the frontiers of science and technology}
author = {Gunawardena, W}
abstractNote = {Direct transfers of technology to developing countries are basically product transfers which may be irrelevant to the recipient country's needs. The process of imitation, however, can build upon local research aided by information transfers so that innovative technology is applied more appropriately. Since developing countries think of technology transfer as a purchased package rather than an intellectual process, most Third World countries have a low innovative capacity at present. This can be overcome if the developed countries will cooperate with information transfers. 24 references. (DCK)}
journal = {Sci. Public Policy; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {7:3}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1980}
month = {Jun}
}