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Municipal sludge disposal economics

Abstract

Costs for disposal of sludges from a municipal wastewater treatment plant normally represents greater than or equal to 25% of the total plant operating cost. The following 5 sludge handling options are considered: chemical conditioning followed by vacuum filtration, and incineration; high-pressure wet-air oxidation and vacuum filtration or filter press prior to incineration; thermal conditioning, vacuum filtraton, and incineration; high-pressure wet-air oxidation and vacuum filtration, with ash to landfill; aerobic or anaerobic digestion, followed by chemical conditioning, vacuum filtration, and disposal on land; and chemical conditioning, followed by a filter press, flash dryer, and sale as fertilizer. The 1st 2 options result in the ultimate disposal of small amounts of ash in a landfill; the digestion options require a significant landfill; the fertilizer option requires a successful marketing and sales effort. To compare the economies of scale for the options, analyses were performed for 3 plant capacities - 10, 100, and 500 mgd; as plant size increases, the economies of scale for incineration system are quite favorable. The anaerobic digestion system has a poorer capital cost-scaling factor. The incinerator options which start with chemical conditioning consume much less electrical power at all treatment plant sizes; incinerator after thermal conditioning uses  More>>
Authors:
Jones, J L; [1]  Bomberger, Jr, D C; Lewis, F M
  1. SRI International, Menlo Park, CA
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-80-106781
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 11:10
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; MUNICIPAL WASTES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS; ANAEROBIC DIGESTION; BIOSYNTHESIS; COMBUSTION; DRYING; FERTILIZERS; FILTRATION; INCINERATORS; METHANE; OXIDATION; SANITARY LANDFILLS; SLUDGES; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; WASTE WATER; WATER TREATMENT PLANTS; ALKANES; BIOCONVERSION; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CRYOGENIC FLUIDS; DIGESTION; FLUIDS; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; LIQUID WASTES; MANAGEMENT; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PROCESSING; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SYNTHESIS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; WASTE PROCESSING; WASTES; WATER; 320604* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Municipalities & Community Systems- Municipal Waste Management- (1980-); 140504 - Solar Energy Conversion- Biomass Production & Conversion- (-1989); 090122 - Hydrocarbon Fuels- Preparation from Wastes or Biomass- (1976-1989)
OSTI ID:
5069487
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ESTHA
Submitting Site:
IEA
Size:
Pages: 968-972
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Jones, J L, Bomberger, Jr, D C, and Lewis, F M. Municipal sludge disposal economics. United States: N. p., 1977. Web. doi:10.1021/es60133a600.
Jones, J L, Bomberger, Jr, D C, & Lewis, F M. Municipal sludge disposal economics. United States. doi:10.1021/es60133a600.
Jones, J L, Bomberger, Jr, D C, and Lewis, F M. 1977. "Municipal sludge disposal economics." United States. doi:10.1021/es60133a600. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1021/es60133a600.
@misc{etde_5069487,
title = {Municipal sludge disposal economics}
author = {Jones, J L, Bomberger, Jr, D C, and Lewis, F M}
abstractNote = {Costs for disposal of sludges from a municipal wastewater treatment plant normally represents greater than or equal to 25% of the total plant operating cost. The following 5 sludge handling options are considered: chemical conditioning followed by vacuum filtration, and incineration; high-pressure wet-air oxidation and vacuum filtration or filter press prior to incineration; thermal conditioning, vacuum filtraton, and incineration; high-pressure wet-air oxidation and vacuum filtration, with ash to landfill; aerobic or anaerobic digestion, followed by chemical conditioning, vacuum filtration, and disposal on land; and chemical conditioning, followed by a filter press, flash dryer, and sale as fertilizer. The 1st 2 options result in the ultimate disposal of small amounts of ash in a landfill; the digestion options require a significant landfill; the fertilizer option requires a successful marketing and sales effort. To compare the economies of scale for the options, analyses were performed for 3 plant capacities - 10, 100, and 500 mgd; as plant size increases, the economies of scale for incineration system are quite favorable. The anaerobic digestion system has a poorer capital cost-scaling factor. The incinerator options which start with chemical conditioning consume much less electrical power at all treatment plant sizes; incinerator after thermal conditioning uses more electricity but less fuel. Digestion requires no direct external fossil fuel input. The relative use of fuel is constant at all plant sizes for other options. The incinerator options can produce a significant amount of steam which may be used. The anaerobic digestion process can be a significant net producer of fuel gas.}
doi = {10.1021/es60133a600}
journal = {Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States)}
volume = {11:10}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United States}
year = {1977}
month = {Oct}
}