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NEW RADIATION RESISTANT GREASES

Abstract

New radiation resistant greases were prepared from commercially available greases by carrying out radioinduced reactions with styrene. The radiation tolerances of the products were 250-1000 fold more than the starting materials and any product of similar properties now available. The various properties of the new products initially and after exposure to large radiation doses were in no case inferior to the original greases and in some respects improvements were observed. Radiation tolerance of commercial greases could be enhanced by the addition of polystyrene to form a physical mixture rather than copolymers. The reaction mechanisms involved at all stages were studied using infrared spectroscopic techniques. (P.C.H.)
Publication Date:
Nov 20, 1962
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-175-1; AED-Conf-63-125-1
Reference Number:
NSA-17-037637
Resource Relation:
Conference: American Chemical Society 142nd National Meeting, Atlantic City, NJ (United States), 9-14 Sep 1962
Subject:
METALS, CERAMICS, AND OTHER MATERIALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; GREASES; INFRARED RADIATION; MIXING; POLYSTYRENE; PREPARATION; RADIATION CHEMISTRY; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION EFFECTS; SPECTROSCOPY; STABILITY; STYRENE
Sponsoring Organizations:
Sponsor not identified
OSTI ID:
4876417
Research Organizations:
Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Submitting Site:
DTIE
Size:
Pages: 35
Announcement Date:
Oct 04, 2013

Citation Formats

DasGupta, Sharda, and Slobodian, J. T. NEW RADIATION RESISTANT GREASES. Canada: N. p., 1962. Web.
DasGupta, Sharda, & Slobodian, J. T. NEW RADIATION RESISTANT GREASES. Canada.
DasGupta, Sharda, and Slobodian, J. T. 1962. "NEW RADIATION RESISTANT GREASES." Canada.
@misc{etde_4876417,
title = {NEW RADIATION RESISTANT GREASES}
author = {DasGupta, Sharda, and Slobodian, J. T.}
abstractNote = {New radiation resistant greases were prepared from commercially available greases by carrying out radioinduced reactions with styrene. The radiation tolerances of the products were 250-1000 fold more than the starting materials and any product of similar properties now available. The various properties of the new products initially and after exposure to large radiation doses were in no case inferior to the original greases and in some respects improvements were observed. Radiation tolerance of commercial greases could be enhanced by the addition of polystyrene to form a physical mixture rather than copolymers. The reaction mechanisms involved at all stages were studied using infrared spectroscopic techniques. (P.C.H.)}
place = {Canada}
year = {1962}
month = {Nov}
}