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Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories

Abstract

Two main strategies exist for long-term information transfer, one which links information through successive transfers of archived material and other forms of knowledge in society, and one - such as marking the site with a monument - relying upon a direct link from the present to the distant future. Digital methods are not recommended for long-term storage, but digital processing may be a valuable tool to structure information summaries, and in the creation of better long-lasting records. Advances in archive management should also be pursued to widen the choice of information carriers of high durability. In the Nordic countries, during the first few thousand years, and perhaps up to the next period of glaciation, monuments at a repository site may be used to warn the public of the presence of dangerous waste. But messages from such markers may pose interpretation problems as we have today for messages left by earlier societies such as rune inscriptions. Since the national borders may change in the time scale relevant for nuclear waste, the creation of an international archive for all radioactive wastes would represent an improvement as regards conservation and retrieval of information. (EG).
Authors:
Jensen, M [1] 
  1. ed.; National Inst. of Radiation Protection, Stockholm (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1996
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
SKB-TR-96-18; CONF-9608208-
Reference Number:
SCA: 052002; PA: AIX-28:038113; EDB-97:077690; SN: 97001796295
Resource Relation:
Conference: Seminar on Information, Conservation and Retrieval, M/S Sigyn (Sweden), Aug 1996; Other Information: DN: Published in 1993 as report NKS/KAN-1.3 (NEI-DK--1359).; PBD: Dec 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Information, conservation and retrieval; Eng, T. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)]; Norberg, E. [National Swedish Archives, Stockholm (Sweden)]; Torbacke, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of History]; Jensen, M. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)]; PB: 147 p.
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; RECORDS MANAGEMENT; DATA BASE MANAGEMENT; DOCUMENTATION; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; INFORMATION RETRIEVAL; PLANNING; RADIOACTIVE WASTE FACILITIES; REGIONAL COOPERATION
OSTI ID:
481050
Research Organizations:
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0284-3757; Other: ON: DE97625884; TRN: SE9700120038113
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE97625884
Submitting Site:
SWDN
Size:
pp. 21-133
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Jensen, M. Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories. Sweden: N. p., 1996. Web.
Jensen, M. Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories. Sweden.
Jensen, M. 1996. "Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories." Sweden.
@misc{etde_481050,
title = {Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories}
author = {Jensen, M}
abstractNote = {Two main strategies exist for long-term information transfer, one which links information through successive transfers of archived material and other forms of knowledge in society, and one - such as marking the site with a monument - relying upon a direct link from the present to the distant future. Digital methods are not recommended for long-term storage, but digital processing may be a valuable tool to structure information summaries, and in the creation of better long-lasting records. Advances in archive management should also be pursued to widen the choice of information carriers of high durability. In the Nordic countries, during the first few thousand years, and perhaps up to the next period of glaciation, monuments at a repository site may be used to warn the public of the presence of dangerous waste. But messages from such markers may pose interpretation problems as we have today for messages left by earlier societies such as rune inscriptions. Since the national borders may change in the time scale relevant for nuclear waste, the creation of an international archive for all radioactive wastes would represent an improvement as regards conservation and retrieval of information. (EG).}
place = {Sweden}
year = {1996}
month = {Dec}
}