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Chernobyl the health consequences

Abstract

This paper focuses initially on selected aspects of the health impact of the Chernobyl accident, and then goes on to discuss some of the pitfalls involved in trying to assess the health detriment in isolation and without regard for the context in which it occurs. The accident on 26 April 1986 was unique. Two explosions, followed by a graphite fire in the destroyed reactor, not only dispersed radionuclides high into the atmosphere, but the fire was instrumental in ensuring the continued dispersion for about ten days. This prolonged discharge into the atmosphere combined with changes in wind direction ensured that radionuclides were widely distributed over Europe and were even detected throughout the Northern Hemisphere. The actual ground deposition was very variable, depending on may factors such as coincident rainfall during the passage of the plume, wind speed and direction, and the topography of the terrain. The mosaic distribution of the ground deposition became much more variable with distance from the site, and is responsible for the wide range of individual doses that characterises this accident. The paper details the health effects of the accident on those immediately involved, and also the delayed health effects, including increased incidence of thyroid cancer,  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1996
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
RPII-96/6; CONF-9604210-
Reference Number:
SCA: 560161; 570100; PA: AIX-28:036615; EDB-97:082491; SN: 97001795520
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference on radiological protection and review of the health consequences of the Chernobyl accident, Dublin (Ireland), 30 Apr 1996; Other Information: PBD: Oct 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Chernobyl - 10 years on. Proceedings of a conference organised by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland; PB: 82 p.
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 57 HEALTH AND SAFETY; PUBLIC HEALTH; CHERNOBYLSK-4 REACTOR; BELARUS; CHILDREN; CONTAMINATION; DOSIMETRY; MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE; NEOPLASMS; PERSONNEL; RADIATION ACCIDENTS; RADIATION DOSES; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; RUSSIAN FEDERATION; THYROID; UKRAINE
OSTI ID:
480977
Research Organizations:
Radiological Protection Inst. of Ireland (Ireland)
Country of Origin:
Ireland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE97624527; TRN: IE9700003036615
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE97624527
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 6-23
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Waight, P J. Chernobyl the health consequences. Ireland: N. p., 1996. Web.
Waight, P J. Chernobyl the health consequences. Ireland.
Waight, P J. 1996. "Chernobyl the health consequences." Ireland.
@misc{etde_480977,
title = {Chernobyl the health consequences}
author = {Waight, P J}
abstractNote = {This paper focuses initially on selected aspects of the health impact of the Chernobyl accident, and then goes on to discuss some of the pitfalls involved in trying to assess the health detriment in isolation and without regard for the context in which it occurs. The accident on 26 April 1986 was unique. Two explosions, followed by a graphite fire in the destroyed reactor, not only dispersed radionuclides high into the atmosphere, but the fire was instrumental in ensuring the continued dispersion for about ten days. This prolonged discharge into the atmosphere combined with changes in wind direction ensured that radionuclides were widely distributed over Europe and were even detected throughout the Northern Hemisphere. The actual ground deposition was very variable, depending on may factors such as coincident rainfall during the passage of the plume, wind speed and direction, and the topography of the terrain. The mosaic distribution of the ground deposition became much more variable with distance from the site, and is responsible for the wide range of individual doses that characterises this accident. The paper details the health effects of the accident on those immediately involved, and also the delayed health effects, including increased incidence of thyroid cancer, among the populations of surrounding areas of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia. It also discusses the widespread psychosocial detriment which resulted from the accident. Finally, the paper evaluated the efficacy of decontamination measures which were adopted in the affected areas in the years following the accident.}
place = {Ireland}
year = {1996}
month = {Oct}
}