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A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst

Abstract

The diminishing resources of petroleum oil has meant that there has been considerable efforts in recent years to find a suitable substitute for gasoline as a transportation fuel. Methanol has been identified as a suitable substitute since it is a readily combustible fuel which can be manufactured from a number of different sources. Methane is commonly used as a starting material for the production of synthesis gas (CO + H{sub 2}) and hence methanol. It is well known that the cleavage of the C-H bond of methane is extremely difficult (bond energy is around 104 kcal/mol) and that fairly drastic conditions are required to convert methane into methanol. Temperatures around 1200 deg C and pressures of up to 100 atmospheres over metal catalysts in a series of reactions are required to effect this process. Efforts have been made to reduce the temperature and the number of steps by using lanthanide ruthenium oxide catalyst but such reactions are still thermodynamically endothermic. An energetically more efficient reaction would be the direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen as the oxidant: CH{sub 4} + 1/2O{sub 2} -> CH{sub 3}OH {Delta}H deg = - 30.7 kcal/mol. Such a direct oxidation route is manifest  More>>
Authors:
Dalton, H [1] 
  1. Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biological Sciences
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1996
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
VTT-SYMP-163; CONF-9601128-
Reference Number:
SCA: 030400; 100200; PA: FI-97:003265; EDB-97:060003; SN: 97001773132
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. symposium of the VTT research programme on chemical reaction mechanisms, Espoo (Finland), 29-30 Jan 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of New catalysts for clean environment; Maijanen, A.; Hase, A. [eds.] [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)]; PB: 264 p.
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; METHANE; METHANOL; OXIDATION; BIOCONVERSION; CHEMICAL ACTIVATION; REACTION KINETICS
OSTI ID:
464536
Research Organizations:
Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)
Country of Origin:
Finland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE97740080; ISBN 951-38-4554-0; TRN: FI9703265
Availability:
OSTI as DE97740080
Submitting Site:
FI
Size:
pp. 155-162
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Dalton, H. A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst. Finland: N. p., 1996. Web.
Dalton, H. A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst. Finland.
Dalton, H. 1996. "A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst." Finland.
@misc{etde_464536,
title = {A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst}
author = {Dalton, H}
abstractNote = {The diminishing resources of petroleum oil has meant that there has been considerable efforts in recent years to find a suitable substitute for gasoline as a transportation fuel. Methanol has been identified as a suitable substitute since it is a readily combustible fuel which can be manufactured from a number of different sources. Methane is commonly used as a starting material for the production of synthesis gas (CO + H{sub 2}) and hence methanol. It is well known that the cleavage of the C-H bond of methane is extremely difficult (bond energy is around 104 kcal/mol) and that fairly drastic conditions are required to convert methane into methanol. Temperatures around 1200 deg C and pressures of up to 100 atmospheres over metal catalysts in a series of reactions are required to effect this process. Efforts have been made to reduce the temperature and the number of steps by using lanthanide ruthenium oxide catalyst but such reactions are still thermodynamically endothermic. An energetically more efficient reaction would be the direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen as the oxidant: CH{sub 4} + 1/2O{sub 2} -> CH{sub 3}OH {Delta}H deg = - 30.7 kcal/mol. Such a direct oxidation route is manifest in the bacterially-mediated oxidation of methane by methanotrophic bacteria. These organisms effect the direct oxidation of methane to methanol by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) as part of the reaction sequences to oxidize methane to carbon dioxide. (14 refs.)}
place = {Finland}
year = {1996}
month = {Dec}
}