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Food Crops Breeding in Sri Lanka - Achievements and challenges

Journal Article:

Abstract

Since Rice is the staple food in Sri Lanka strong emphasis has been given for the improvement of Rice in Sri Lanka. Over the last three decades 36 high yielding rice varieties have been developed. The present yield potential of Sri Lanka`s best varieties have been recorded to be be around 10 mt/ha. At present more than 90% of the total paddy extent is grown with modern high yielding rice varieties and as a result the national paddy production has increased from 1.8 mt/ha to 3.5 mt/ha. Induced mutations is used in plant breeding. Use of radiation to produce haploids and for production of transitory sexuality in apomicts have been done. Under the coarse grains and millet varietal program, maize have recorded increasing attention owing to the fact that is is used for human consumption and as feed grain for poultry. Promising varieties of Soya bean, cowpea, mung bean, black gram and ground nut have been recommended for cultivation. Research attention has also been directed towards Root and Tuber crops which have great potential in providong food for the rapidly increasing population in Sri Lanka. Potato is the most important and popular tuber crop. A number of improved varieties with  More>>
Authors:
Jayawardena, S D.L.; Peiris, R [1] 
  1. Central Agricultural Research Institute, Gannoruwa, Peradeniya (Sierra Leone)
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1988
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
SCA: 553002; PA: AIX-28:033949; EDB-97:063266; SN: 97001774797
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: BIO News; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: 1988
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; CROPS; PLANT BREEDING; RICE; CEREALS; FRUITS; HAPLOIDY; MUTATIONS; SRI LANKA; VEGETABLES
OSTI ID:
463561
Country of Origin:
Sri Lanka
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: XZ686Z; ISSN 1391-1910; TRN: LK9500030033949
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 22-34
Announcement Date:
May 09, 1997

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Jayawardena, S D.L., and Peiris, R. Food Crops Breeding in Sri Lanka - Achievements and challenges. Sri Lanka: N. p., 1988. Web.
Jayawardena, S D.L., & Peiris, R. Food Crops Breeding in Sri Lanka - Achievements and challenges. Sri Lanka.
Jayawardena, S D.L., and Peiris, R. 1988. "Food Crops Breeding in Sri Lanka - Achievements and challenges." Sri Lanka.
@misc{etde_463561,
title = {Food Crops Breeding in Sri Lanka - Achievements and challenges}
author = {Jayawardena, S D.L., and Peiris, R}
abstractNote = {Since Rice is the staple food in Sri Lanka strong emphasis has been given for the improvement of Rice in Sri Lanka. Over the last three decades 36 high yielding rice varieties have been developed. The present yield potential of Sri Lanka`s best varieties have been recorded to be be around 10 mt/ha. At present more than 90% of the total paddy extent is grown with modern high yielding rice varieties and as a result the national paddy production has increased from 1.8 mt/ha to 3.5 mt/ha. Induced mutations is used in plant breeding. Use of radiation to produce haploids and for production of transitory sexuality in apomicts have been done. Under the coarse grains and millet varietal program, maize have recorded increasing attention owing to the fact that is is used for human consumption and as feed grain for poultry. Promising varieties of Soya bean, cowpea, mung bean, black gram and ground nut have been recommended for cultivation. Research attention has also been directed towards Root and Tuber crops which have great potential in providong food for the rapidly increasing population in Sri Lanka. Potato is the most important and popular tuber crop. A number of improved varieties with respect to a number of local fruit crops such as banana, sweet orange, lemonime, avocado, pineapple, rambutan, grapes.have been introduced. New improved varieties of indigenous vegetables such as tomato, brinjal etc. have been produced. Chillies and onions with desirable qualities also have been identified. Mutation breeding provides a novel approach to the plant breeders for raising the productivity of crop plants, thus complementing conventional methods. Any way the use of induced mutations in crop improvement has not been properly exploited in Sri Lanka as yet.}
journal = {BIO News}
issue = {2}
volume = {4}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Sri Lanka}
year = {1988}
month = {Dec}
}