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An electrochemical sensor for monitoring oxygen or hydrogen in water

Abstract

Preliminary studies have been done on a simple electrochemical sensor which shows promise as a cheap, robust instrument for measuring dissolved oxygen or hydrogen in water. The sensor is based upon the solid-state electrolyte ``Nafion`` (trade name of perfluorinated sulphonic acid, manufactured by DuPont Inc.). The Nafion was dissolved in a mixture of aliphatic alcohols, made into a slurry with platinum black, and applied to a {approx}1 cm-square electrode made of stainless steel gauze. The potential of the electrode was measured relative to a standard calomel electrode (SCE) in acid solutions at room temperature through which mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen or hydrogen and nitrogen were bubbled. The sensor was responsive to the equilibrating gas with good reproducibility. A similar sensor without the Nafion was not at all sensitive to changes in oxygen concentration. The voltage response of the sensor showed non-Nernstian behaviour, which suggests that the electrochemical reactions at the electrode surface are complex. Further testing of the sensor is required to verify its sensitivity and responsiveness in typical reactor coolant chemistries and to demonstrate its durability over a range of temperatures. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab.
Authors:
Yang, Leitai; Morris, D R; Lister, D H [1] 
  1. University of New Brunswick, Fredericton (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 1997
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-927; CONF-9310467-
Reference Number:
SCA: 220200; PA: AIX-28:034399; EDB-97:060811; SN: 97001775082
Resource Relation:
Conference: Technical committee meeting on influence of water chemistry on fuel cladding behaviour, Rez (Czech Republic), 4-8 Oct 1993; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Influence of water chemistry on fuel cladding behaviour. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting; PB: 499 p.
Subject:
22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; HYDROGEN; MONITORS; OXYGEN; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; REACTOR MONITORING SYSTEMS; WATER; WATER CHEMISTRY
OSTI ID:
462421
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1011-4289; Other: ON: DE97622401; TRN: XA9743702034399
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE97622401
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 381-389
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Yang, Leitai, Morris, D R, and Lister, D H. An electrochemical sensor for monitoring oxygen or hydrogen in water. IAEA: N. p., 1997. Web.
Yang, Leitai, Morris, D R, & Lister, D H. An electrochemical sensor for monitoring oxygen or hydrogen in water. IAEA.
Yang, Leitai, Morris, D R, and Lister, D H. 1997. "An electrochemical sensor for monitoring oxygen or hydrogen in water." IAEA.
@misc{etde_462421,
title = {An electrochemical sensor for monitoring oxygen or hydrogen in water}
author = {Yang, Leitai, Morris, D R, and Lister, D H}
abstractNote = {Preliminary studies have been done on a simple electrochemical sensor which shows promise as a cheap, robust instrument for measuring dissolved oxygen or hydrogen in water. The sensor is based upon the solid-state electrolyte ``Nafion`` (trade name of perfluorinated sulphonic acid, manufactured by DuPont Inc.). The Nafion was dissolved in a mixture of aliphatic alcohols, made into a slurry with platinum black, and applied to a {approx}1 cm-square electrode made of stainless steel gauze. The potential of the electrode was measured relative to a standard calomel electrode (SCE) in acid solutions at room temperature through which mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen or hydrogen and nitrogen were bubbled. The sensor was responsive to the equilibrating gas with good reproducibility. A similar sensor without the Nafion was not at all sensitive to changes in oxygen concentration. The voltage response of the sensor showed non-Nernstian behaviour, which suggests that the electrochemical reactions at the electrode surface are complex. Further testing of the sensor is required to verify its sensitivity and responsiveness in typical reactor coolant chemistries and to demonstrate its durability over a range of temperatures. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1997}
month = {Feb}
}