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Fine root production at drained peatland sites

Abstract

The preliminary results of the Finnish project `Carbon balance of peatlands and climate change` show that fine roots play an important role in carbon cycling on peat soils. After drainage the roots of mire species are gradually replaced by the roots of trees and other forest species. Pine fine root biomass reaches a maximum level by the time of crown closure, some 20 years after drainage on pine mire. The aim of this study is to compare the results of the sequential coring method and the ingrowth bag method used for estimating fine root production on three drained peatland sites of different fertility. The results are preliminary and continuation to the work done in the study Pine root production on drained peatlands, which is part of the Finnish project `Carbon cycling on peatlands and climate change`. In this study the fine root biomass was greater on the poor site than on the rich sites. Pine fine root production increased with the decrease in fertility. Root turnover and the production of field layer species were greater on the rich sites than on the poor site. The results suggested that the in growth bag method measured more root activity than the magnitude  More>>
Authors:
Finer, L; [1]  Laine, J [2] 
  1. Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Joensuu Research Station
  2. Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1996
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
SA-PUB-1/96; CONF-9510430-
Reference Number:
SCA: 540220; 540120; PA: FI-97:003200; EDB-97:057322; SN: 97001761940
Resource Relation:
Conference: International workshop on northern peatlands in global climatic change, Hyytiaelae (Finland), 8-12 Oct 1995; Other Information: DN: SILMU Research Programme; PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Northern peatlands in global climatic change; Laiho, R.; Laine, J.; Vasander, H. [eds.] [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology]; PB: 302 p.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; WETLANDS; CARBON CYCLE; PEAT; SOILS; PINES; BIOMASS
OSTI ID:
458159
Research Organizations:
Academy of Finland, Helsinki (Finland)
Country of Origin:
Finland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE97736336; ISBN 951-37-1865-4; TRN: FI9703200
Availability:
OSTI as DE97736336
Submitting Site:
FI
Size:
pp. 40-46
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Finer, L, and Laine, J. Fine root production at drained peatland sites. Finland: N. p., 1996. Web.
Finer, L, & Laine, J. Fine root production at drained peatland sites. Finland.
Finer, L, and Laine, J. 1996. "Fine root production at drained peatland sites." Finland.
@misc{etde_458159,
title = {Fine root production at drained peatland sites}
author = {Finer, L, and Laine, J}
abstractNote = {The preliminary results of the Finnish project `Carbon balance of peatlands and climate change` show that fine roots play an important role in carbon cycling on peat soils. After drainage the roots of mire species are gradually replaced by the roots of trees and other forest species. Pine fine root biomass reaches a maximum level by the time of crown closure, some 20 years after drainage on pine mire. The aim of this study is to compare the results of the sequential coring method and the ingrowth bag method used for estimating fine root production on three drained peatland sites of different fertility. The results are preliminary and continuation to the work done in the study Pine root production on drained peatlands, which is part of the Finnish project `Carbon cycling on peatlands and climate change`. In this study the fine root biomass was greater on the poor site than on the rich sites. Pine fine root production increased with the decrease in fertility. Root turnover and the production of field layer species were greater on the rich sites than on the poor site. The results suggested that the in growth bag method measured more root activity than the magnitude of production. More than two growing seasons would have been needed to balance the root dynamics in the in growth bags with the surrounding soil. That time would probably have been longer on the poor site than on the rich ones and longer for pine and field layer consisting of dwarf shrubs than for field layer consisting of sedge like species and birch. (11 refs.)}
place = {Finland}
year = {1996}
month = {Dec}
}