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Applications of focused MeV light ion beams for high resolution channeling contrast imaging

Abstract

The technique of Nuclear Microscopy, utilizing a focused ion probe of typically MeV H{sup +} or He{sup +} ions, can produce images where the contrast depends on typical Ion Beam Analysis (lBA) processes. The probe forming lens system usually utilizes strong focusing, precision magnetic quadrupole lenses and the probe is scanned over the target to produce images. Originally, this imaging technique was developed to utilize backscattered particles with incident beam currents typically of a few nA, and the technique became known as Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM). Recently, the technique has been developed further to utilize the forward scattering of ions incident along a major crystal axis in thin crystals. This technique is known as Channeling Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (CSTIM). Since nearly all incident ions are detected, CSTIM is highly efficient and very low beam currents are sufficient for imaging, typically as low as a few fA. This allows probes as small as 50 nm to be used. In this paper we briefly review the recent applications of these emerging techniques to a variety of single crystal materials (authors). 13 refs., 5 figs.
Authors:
Jamieson, D N; Breese, M B.H.; Prawer, S; Dooley, S P; Allen, M G; Bettiol, A A; Saint, A; [1]  Ryan, C G [2] 
  1. Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics
  2. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1993
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-mf-15527; CONF-9311348-
Reference Number:
SCA: 360605; 665300; PA: AIX-28:025006; EDB-97:042102; SN: 97001752574
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8. Australian conference on nuclear techniques of analysis, Lucas Heights (Australia), 17-19 Nov 1993; Other Information: PBD: 1993; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 8. Australian conference on nuclear techniques of analysis; PB: 194 p.
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 66 PHYSICS; DIAMONDS; ION MICROPROBE ANALYSIS; ION MICROSCOPY; PYRITE; CHANNELING; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; FOCUSING; ION SCATTERING ANALYSIS; PHOTODETECTORS; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION
Sponsoring Organizations:
Australian Research Council, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Australian Telecommunication and Electronics Research Board, North Ryde, NSW (Australia)
OSTI ID:
445949
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE97616714; TRN: AU9715809025006
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE97616714
Submitting Site:
AUN
Size:
pp. 181-183
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Jamieson, D N, Breese, M B.H., Prawer, S, Dooley, S P, Allen, M G, Bettiol, A A, Saint, A, and Ryan, C G. Applications of focused MeV light ion beams for high resolution channeling contrast imaging. Australia: N. p., 1993. Web.
Jamieson, D N, Breese, M B.H., Prawer, S, Dooley, S P, Allen, M G, Bettiol, A A, Saint, A, & Ryan, C G. Applications of focused MeV light ion beams for high resolution channeling contrast imaging. Australia.
Jamieson, D N, Breese, M B.H., Prawer, S, Dooley, S P, Allen, M G, Bettiol, A A, Saint, A, and Ryan, C G. 1993. "Applications of focused MeV light ion beams for high resolution channeling contrast imaging." Australia.
@misc{etde_445949,
title = {Applications of focused MeV light ion beams for high resolution channeling contrast imaging}
author = {Jamieson, D N, Breese, M B.H., Prawer, S, Dooley, S P, Allen, M G, Bettiol, A A, Saint, A, and Ryan, C G}
abstractNote = {The technique of Nuclear Microscopy, utilizing a focused ion probe of typically MeV H{sup +} or He{sup +} ions, can produce images where the contrast depends on typical Ion Beam Analysis (lBA) processes. The probe forming lens system usually utilizes strong focusing, precision magnetic quadrupole lenses and the probe is scanned over the target to produce images. Originally, this imaging technique was developed to utilize backscattered particles with incident beam currents typically of a few nA, and the technique became known as Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM). Recently, the technique has been developed further to utilize the forward scattering of ions incident along a major crystal axis in thin crystals. This technique is known as Channeling Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (CSTIM). Since nearly all incident ions are detected, CSTIM is highly efficient and very low beam currents are sufficient for imaging, typically as low as a few fA. This allows probes as small as 50 nm to be used. In this paper we briefly review the recent applications of these emerging techniques to a variety of single crystal materials (authors). 13 refs., 5 figs.}
place = {Australia}
year = {1993}
month = {Dec}
}