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Core melt retention and cooling concept of the ERP

Abstract

For the French/German European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) mitigative measures to cope with the event of a severe accident with core melt down are considered already at the design stage. Following the course of a postulated severe accident with reactor pressure vessel melt through one of the most important features of a future design must be to stabilize and cool the melt within the containment by dedicated measures. This measures should - as far as possible - be passive. One very promising solution for core melt retention seems to be a large enough spreading of the melt on a high temperature resistant protection layer with water cooling from above. This is the favorite concept for the EPR. In dealing with the retention of a molten core outside of the RPV several ``steps`` from leaving the RPV to finally stabilize the melt have to gone through. These steps are: collection of the melt; transfer of the melt; distribution of the melt; confining; cooling and stabilization. The technical features for the EPR solution of a large spreading of the melt are: Dedicated spreading chamber outside the reactor pit (area about 150 m{sup 2}); high temperature resistant protection layers (e.g. Zirconia bricks) at  More>>
Authors:
Weisshaeupl, H; [1]  Yvon, M [2] 
  1. SIEMENS/KWU, Erlangen (Germany)
  2. Nuclear Power International, Paris (France)
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1996
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-920; CONF-9411339-
Reference Number:
SCA: 210200; PA: AIX-28:021793; EDB-97:039721; SN: 97001747504
Resource Relation:
Conference: Advisory group meeting on technical feasibility and reliability of passive safety systems for nuclear power plants, Juelich (Germany), 21-24 Nov 1994; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Technical feasibility and reliability of passive safety systems for nuclear power plants. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting; PB: 357 p.
Subject:
21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; PWR TYPE REACTORS; COOLING; DESIGN; EUROPE; FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY; FRANCE; MELTDOWN; MITIGATION; REACTOR CORES
OSTI ID:
440039
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1011-4289; Other: ON: DE97615987; TRN: XA9743173021793
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE97615987
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 253-266
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Weisshaeupl, H, and Yvon, M. Core melt retention and cooling concept of the ERP. IAEA: N. p., 1996. Web.
Weisshaeupl, H, & Yvon, M. Core melt retention and cooling concept of the ERP. IAEA.
Weisshaeupl, H, and Yvon, M. 1996. "Core melt retention and cooling concept of the ERP." IAEA.
@misc{etde_440039,
title = {Core melt retention and cooling concept of the ERP}
author = {Weisshaeupl, H, and Yvon, M}
abstractNote = {For the French/German European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) mitigative measures to cope with the event of a severe accident with core melt down are considered already at the design stage. Following the course of a postulated severe accident with reactor pressure vessel melt through one of the most important features of a future design must be to stabilize and cool the melt within the containment by dedicated measures. This measures should - as far as possible - be passive. One very promising solution for core melt retention seems to be a large enough spreading of the melt on a high temperature resistant protection layer with water cooling from above. This is the favorite concept for the EPR. In dealing with the retention of a molten core outside of the RPV several ``steps`` from leaving the RPV to finally stabilize the melt have to gone through. These steps are: collection of the melt; transfer of the melt; distribution of the melt; confining; cooling and stabilization. The technical features for the EPR solution of a large spreading of the melt are: Dedicated spreading chamber outside the reactor pit (area about 150 m{sup 2}); high temperature resistant protection layers (e.g. Zirconia bricks) at the bottom and part of the lateral structures (thus avoiding melt concrete interaction); reactor pit and spreading compartment are connected via a discharge channel which has a slope to the spreading area and is closed by a steel plate, which will resist the core melt for a certain time in order to allow a collection of the melt; the spreading compartments is connected with the In-Containment Refuelling Water Storage Tank (IRWST) with pipes for water flooding after spreading. These pipes are closed and will only be opened by the hot melt itself. It is shown how the course of the different steps mentioned above is processed and how each of these steps is automatically and passively achieved. (Abstract Truncated)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1996}
month = {Dec}
}