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Active or passive systems? The EPR approach

Abstract

In attempting to review how EPR is contemplated to meet requirements applicable to future nuclear power plants, the authors indicate where they see the markets and the corresponding unit sizes for the EPR which is a generic key factor for competitiveness. There are no reason in industrialized countries, other than USA (where the investment and amortizing practices under control by Public Utility Commission are quite particular), not to build future plants in the 1000 to 1500 MWe range. Standardization, which has been actively applied all along the French program and for the Konvoi plants, does not prevent evolution and allows to concentrate large engineering effort in smooth realization of plants and achieve actual construction and commissioning without significant delays. In order to contribute to public trust renewal, a next generation of power reactors should be fundamentally less likely to incur serious accidents. To reach this goal the best of passive and active systems must be considered without forgetting that the most important source of knowledge is construction and operating experience. Criteria to assess passive systems investigated for possible implementation in the EPR, such as simplicity of design, impact on plant operation, safety and cost, are discussed. Examples of the principal  More>>
Authors:
Bonhomme, N; [1]  Py, J P [2] 
  1. Nuclear Power International, Cedex (France)
  2. FRAMATOME, Cedex (France)
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1996
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-920; CONF-9411339-
Reference Number:
SCA: 220200; PA: AIX-28:021625; EDB-97:039936; SN: 97001747460
Resource Relation:
Conference: Advisory group meeting on technical feasibility and reliability of passive safety systems for nuclear power plants, Juelich (Germany), 21-24 Nov 1994; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Technical feasibility and reliability of passive safety systems for nuclear power plants. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting; PB: 357 p.
Subject:
22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; POWER REACTORS; REACTOR SAFETY; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; SAFETY ENGINEERING; STANDARDIZATION
OSTI ID:
440024
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1011-4289; Other: ON: DE97615987; TRN: XA9743163021625
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE97615987
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 113-132
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Bonhomme, N, and Py, J P. Active or passive systems? The EPR approach. IAEA: N. p., 1996. Web.
Bonhomme, N, & Py, J P. Active or passive systems? The EPR approach. IAEA.
Bonhomme, N, and Py, J P. 1996. "Active or passive systems? The EPR approach." IAEA.
@misc{etde_440024,
title = {Active or passive systems? The EPR approach}
author = {Bonhomme, N, and Py, J P}
abstractNote = {In attempting to review how EPR is contemplated to meet requirements applicable to future nuclear power plants, the authors indicate where they see the markets and the corresponding unit sizes for the EPR which is a generic key factor for competitiveness. There are no reason in industrialized countries, other than USA (where the investment and amortizing practices under control by Public Utility Commission are quite particular), not to build future plants in the 1000 to 1500 MWe range. Standardization, which has been actively applied all along the French program and for the Konvoi plants, does not prevent evolution and allows to concentrate large engineering effort in smooth realization of plants and achieve actual construction and commissioning without significant delays. In order to contribute to public trust renewal, a next generation of power reactors should be fundamentally less likely to incur serious accidents. To reach this goal the best of passive and active systems must be considered without forgetting that the most important source of knowledge is construction and operating experience. Criteria to assess passive systems investigated for possible implementation in the EPR, such as simplicity of design, impact on plant operation, safety and cost, are discussed. Examples of the principal passive systems investigated are described and reasons why they have been dropped after screening through the criteria are given. (author). 11 figs.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1996}
month = {Dec}
}