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Dosimetric precision requirements and quantities for characterizing the response of tumors and normal tissues

Abstract

Based on simple radiobiological models the effect of the distribution of absorbed dose in therapy beams on the radiation response of tumor and normal tissue volumes are investigated. Under the assumption that the dose variation in the treated volume is small it is shown that the response of the tissue to radiation is determined mainly by the mean dose to the tumor or normal tissue volume in question. Quantitative expressions are also given for the increased probability of normal tissue complications and the decreased probability of tumor control as a function of increasing dose variations around the mean dose level to these tissues. When the dose variations are large the minimum tumor dose (to cm{sup 3} size volumes) will generally be better related to tumor control and the highest dose to significant portions of normal tissue correlates best to complications. In order not to lose more than one out of 20 curable patients (95% of highest possible treatment outcome) the required accuracy in the dose distribution delivered to the target volume should be 2.5% (1{sigma}) for a mean dose response gradient {gamma} in the range 2 - 3. For more steeply responding tumors and normal tissues even stricter requirements may  More>>
Authors:
Brahme, A [1] 
  1. Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics
Publication Date:
Aug 01, 1996
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-896; CONF-940864-
Reference Number:
SCA: 550603; 560120; 560101; PA: AIX-28:018205; EDB-97:029537; SN: 97001735900
Resource Relation:
Conference: Interregional seminar on radiotherapy dosimetry: radiation dose in radiotherapy from prescription to delivery, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), 27-30 Aug 1994; Other Information: PBD: Aug 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Radiation dose in radiotherapy from prescription to delivery; PB: 293 p.
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; RADIOTHERAPY; ACCURACY; ANIMAL TISSUES; CARCINOMAS; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; DOSIMETRY; FRACTIONATED IRRADIATION; PATIENTS; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; TUMOR CELLS
OSTI ID:
429941
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1011-4289; Other: ON: DE97614216; TRN: XA9642845018205
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE97614216
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 49-65
Announcement Date:
Feb 24, 1997

Citation Formats

Brahme, A. Dosimetric precision requirements and quantities for characterizing the response of tumors and normal tissues. IAEA: N. p., 1996. Web.
Brahme, A. Dosimetric precision requirements and quantities for characterizing the response of tumors and normal tissues. IAEA.
Brahme, A. 1996. "Dosimetric precision requirements and quantities for characterizing the response of tumors and normal tissues." IAEA.
@misc{etde_429941,
title = {Dosimetric precision requirements and quantities for characterizing the response of tumors and normal tissues}
author = {Brahme, A}
abstractNote = {Based on simple radiobiological models the effect of the distribution of absorbed dose in therapy beams on the radiation response of tumor and normal tissue volumes are investigated. Under the assumption that the dose variation in the treated volume is small it is shown that the response of the tissue to radiation is determined mainly by the mean dose to the tumor or normal tissue volume in question. Quantitative expressions are also given for the increased probability of normal tissue complications and the decreased probability of tumor control as a function of increasing dose variations around the mean dose level to these tissues. When the dose variations are large the minimum tumor dose (to cm{sup 3} size volumes) will generally be better related to tumor control and the highest dose to significant portions of normal tissue correlates best to complications. In order not to lose more than one out of 20 curable patients (95% of highest possible treatment outcome) the required accuracy in the dose distribution delivered to the target volume should be 2.5% (1{sigma}) for a mean dose response gradient {gamma} in the range 2 - 3. For more steeply responding tumors and normal tissues even stricter requirements may be desirable. (author). 15 refs, 6 figs.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1996}
month = {Aug}
}