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Stratospheric ozone reduction and its relation to natural and man made sources

Abstract

Approximately 90 % of the total ozone mass is in the stratosphere (between approximately 12 and 50 km), the rest is in the troposphere (below 12 km). The global distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and its variation over time have been studied extensively over several decades. These studies include observations by ground based instruments (e.g. Dobson instruments), instruments on airborne platforms (e.g. ozone sondes) and on satellites, and model studies which simulate the chemical and dynamical behaviour of the stratosphere. These studies have given good information about the processes which determine the ozone distribution, and how man made emissions affect the distribution. Observations have revealed that there are large year to year variations in stratospheric ozone above a particular location. These variations are difficult to predict as they are connected to irregular weather patterns. However, the observations have shown that there has been a long term decrease in stratospheric ozone on a global scale during the last two decades. The decrease has been most pronounced during the last five to six years and is seen both in the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres. The strong decrease in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic continent, which has been observed since the  More>>
Authors:
Isaksen, I S [1] 
  1. Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Geophysics
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1995
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
SA-PUB-6/95; CONF-9508257-
Reference Number:
SCA: 540120; PA: FI-97:003100; EDB-97:028895; SN: 97001727859
Resource Relation:
Conference: SILMU conference on climate change, Helsinki (Finland), 22-25 Aug 1995; Other Information: DN: SILMU Research Programme; PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of International conference on past, present and future climate. Proceedings; Heikinheimo, P. [ed.]; PB: 490 p.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; OZONE LAYER; OZONE; CHLOROFLUOROCARBONS; AIR POLLUTION; AEROSOLS; VARIATIONS; STRATOSPHERE; SOLAR CYCLE
OSTI ID:
428579
Research Organizations:
Academy of Finland, Helsinki (Finland)
Country of Origin:
Finland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE97724948; ISBN 951-37-1721-6; TRN: FI9703100
Availability:
OSTI as DE97724948
Submitting Site:
FI
Size:
pp. 489-490
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Isaksen, I S. Stratospheric ozone reduction and its relation to natural and man made sources. Finland: N. p., 1995. Web.
Isaksen, I S. Stratospheric ozone reduction and its relation to natural and man made sources. Finland.
Isaksen, I S. 1995. "Stratospheric ozone reduction and its relation to natural and man made sources." Finland.
@misc{etde_428579,
title = {Stratospheric ozone reduction and its relation to natural and man made sources}
author = {Isaksen, I S}
abstractNote = {Approximately 90 % of the total ozone mass is in the stratosphere (between approximately 12 and 50 km), the rest is in the troposphere (below 12 km). The global distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and its variation over time have been studied extensively over several decades. These studies include observations by ground based instruments (e.g. Dobson instruments), instruments on airborne platforms (e.g. ozone sondes) and on satellites, and model studies which simulate the chemical and dynamical behaviour of the stratosphere. These studies have given good information about the processes which determine the ozone distribution, and how man made emissions affect the distribution. Observations have revealed that there are large year to year variations in stratospheric ozone above a particular location. These variations are difficult to predict as they are connected to irregular weather patterns. However, the observations have shown that there has been a long term decrease in stratospheric ozone on a global scale during the last two decades. The decrease has been most pronounced during the last five to six years and is seen both in the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres. The strong decrease in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic continent, which has been observed since the mid 80s, and which has reduced the total ozone column with more than 50 % compared with earlier observations, is proven to be a result of increased man made emissions of CFCs. There are also mounting evidences that Northern Hemispheric ozone reductions observed since 1980 are connected to man made emissions of CFCs}
place = {Finland}
year = {1995}
month = {Dec}
}