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Formation and growth of sulfur derived particles in the marine environment

Abstract

Aerosol particles modify the Earth`s radiation balance directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and indirectly via their influence on cloud properties. The indirect climate forcing due to aerosols probably dominates over that of the direct forcing over global scale, and is induced primary by sulfate originating from both natural and anthropogenic sources. A large portion of the global sulfur flux is due to dimethylsulfide (DMS) released from the ocean surface, where it is produced in large quantities by various biogenic processes. DMS is believed to be the primary particulate precursor over vast oceanic regions, hence having a potential to modify aerosol climatic effects over a major portion of the Earth`s surface. The connection between marine DMS emissions and the resulting climate forcing involves several steps still not properly quantified. Among the open questions related to this system, perhaps the most critical ones are when and where the DMS-derived particles are formed in the atmosphere, and how these particles grow into sizes where they are able to alter cloud properties, such as cloud albedos, lifetimes and precipitation efficiencies, that are relevant to climate. In this work, production and growth of sulfur particles has been examined using a simple, yet realistic  More>>
Authors:
Kerminen, V M; Wexler, A; Hillamo, R [1] 
  1. Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Air Quality Dept.
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1995
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
SA-PUB-6/95; CONF-9508257-
Reference Number:
SCA: 540120; PA: FI-97:003083; EDB-97:028855; SN: 97001727842
Resource Relation:
Conference: SILMU conference on climate change, Helsinki (Finland), 22-25 Aug 1995; Other Information: DN: SILMU Research Programme; PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of International conference on past, present and future climate. Proceedings; Heikinheimo, P. [ed.]; PB: 490 p.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AEROSOLS; CLIMATIC CHANGE; CONDENSATION NUCLEI; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; CLOUDS; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; DIMETHYL SULFIDE
OSTI ID:
428565
Research Organizations:
Academy of Finland, Helsinki (Finland)
Country of Origin:
Finland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE97724948; ISBN 951-37-1721-6; TRN: FI9703083
Availability:
OSTI as DE97724948
Submitting Site:
FI
Size:
pp. 340-343
Announcement Date:
Feb 20, 1997

Citation Formats

Kerminen, V M, Wexler, A, and Hillamo, R. Formation and growth of sulfur derived particles in the marine environment. Finland: N. p., 1995. Web.
Kerminen, V M, Wexler, A, & Hillamo, R. Formation and growth of sulfur derived particles in the marine environment. Finland.
Kerminen, V M, Wexler, A, and Hillamo, R. 1995. "Formation and growth of sulfur derived particles in the marine environment." Finland.
@misc{etde_428565,
title = {Formation and growth of sulfur derived particles in the marine environment}
author = {Kerminen, V M, Wexler, A, and Hillamo, R}
abstractNote = {Aerosol particles modify the Earth`s radiation balance directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and indirectly via their influence on cloud properties. The indirect climate forcing due to aerosols probably dominates over that of the direct forcing over global scale, and is induced primary by sulfate originating from both natural and anthropogenic sources. A large portion of the global sulfur flux is due to dimethylsulfide (DMS) released from the ocean surface, where it is produced in large quantities by various biogenic processes. DMS is believed to be the primary particulate precursor over vast oceanic regions, hence having a potential to modify aerosol climatic effects over a major portion of the Earth`s surface. The connection between marine DMS emissions and the resulting climate forcing involves several steps still not properly quantified. Among the open questions related to this system, perhaps the most critical ones are when and where the DMS-derived particles are formed in the atmosphere, and how these particles grow into sizes where they are able to alter cloud properties, such as cloud albedos, lifetimes and precipitation efficiencies, that are relevant to climate. In this work, production and growth of sulfur particles has been examined using a simple, yet realistic model that simulates the processes taking place in a remote marine boundary layer. The specific questions examined include: (1) what is the role of boundary layer dynamics in affecting the condensation nuclei (CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production in this system, (2) what are the factors controlling the growth of fresh CN into CCN, and (3) how does the presence of boundary layer clouds interact with CN/CCN production}
place = {Finland}
year = {1995}
month = {Dec}
}