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Ultraviolet radiation in Finland

Abstract

Solar ultraviolet radiation is damaging for living organisms due to its high energy pro each photon. The UV radiation is often separated into three regions according to the wavelength: UVC (200-280 nm), UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). The most hazardous part, UVC is absorbed completely in the upper atmosphere by molecular oxygen. UVB radiation is absorbed by atmospheric ozone partly, and it is reaching Earth`s surface, as UVA radiation. Besides atmospheric ozone, very important factors in determining the intensity of UVB radiation globally are the solar zenith angle and cloudiness. It may be calculated from global ozone changes that the clear-sky UVB doses may have enhanced by 10-15 % during spring and 5-10 % during summer at the latitudes of Finland, following the decrease of total ozone between 1979-90. The Finnish ozone and UV monitoring activities have become a part of international activities, especially the EU Environment and Climate Programme`s research projects. The main national level effort has been the Finnish Academy`s climatic change programme, SILMU 1990-95. This presentation summarises the scientific results reached during the SILMU project
Authors:
Taalas, P; Koskela, T; Damski, J; Supperi, A; [1]  Kyroe, E [2] 
  1. Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Section of Ozone and UV Research
  2. Finnish Meteorological Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1996
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
SA-PUB-4/96
Reference Number:
SCA: 540120; PA: FI-97:003108; EDB-97:028899; SN: 97001727867
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: SILMU Research Programme; PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of The Finnish research programme on climate change. Final report; Roos, J. [ed.]; PB: 507 p.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; OZONE LAYER; SOLAR RADIATION; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; FINLAND; OZONE; MONITORING; DOSE RATES
OSTI ID:
428485
Research Organizations:
Academy of Finland, Helsinki (Finland)
Country of Origin:
Finland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE97724949; ISBN 951-37-1961-8; TRN: FI9703108
Availability:
OSTI as DE97724949
Submitting Site:
FI
Size:
pp. 83-91
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Taalas, P, Koskela, T, Damski, J, Supperi, A, and Kyroe, E. Ultraviolet radiation in Finland. Finland: N. p., 1996. Web.
Taalas, P, Koskela, T, Damski, J, Supperi, A, & Kyroe, E. Ultraviolet radiation in Finland. Finland.
Taalas, P, Koskela, T, Damski, J, Supperi, A, and Kyroe, E. 1996. "Ultraviolet radiation in Finland." Finland.
@misc{etde_428485,
title = {Ultraviolet radiation in Finland}
author = {Taalas, P, Koskela, T, Damski, J, Supperi, A, and Kyroe, E}
abstractNote = {Solar ultraviolet radiation is damaging for living organisms due to its high energy pro each photon. The UV radiation is often separated into three regions according to the wavelength: UVC (200-280 nm), UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). The most hazardous part, UVC is absorbed completely in the upper atmosphere by molecular oxygen. UVB radiation is absorbed by atmospheric ozone partly, and it is reaching Earth`s surface, as UVA radiation. Besides atmospheric ozone, very important factors in determining the intensity of UVB radiation globally are the solar zenith angle and cloudiness. It may be calculated from global ozone changes that the clear-sky UVB doses may have enhanced by 10-15 % during spring and 5-10 % during summer at the latitudes of Finland, following the decrease of total ozone between 1979-90. The Finnish ozone and UV monitoring activities have become a part of international activities, especially the EU Environment and Climate Programme`s research projects. The main national level effort has been the Finnish Academy`s climatic change programme, SILMU 1990-95. This presentation summarises the scientific results reached during the SILMU project}
place = {Finland}
year = {1996}
month = {Dec}
}