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FARMLAND: Model description and evaluation of model performance

Abstract

The FARMLAND model was originally developed for use in connection with continuous, routine releases of radionuclides, but because it has many time-dependent features it has been developed further for a single accidental release. The most recent version of FARMLAND is flexible and can be used to predict activity concentrations in food as a function of time after both accidental and routine releases of radionuclides. The effect of deposition at different times of the year can be taken into account. FARMLAND contains a suite of models which simulate radionuclide transfer through different parts of the foodchain. The models can be used in different combinations and offer the flexibility to assess a variety of radiological situations. The main foods considered are green vegetables, grain products, root vegetables, milk, meat and offal from cattle, and meat and offal from sheep. A large variety of elements can be considered although the degree of complexity with which some are modelled is greater than others; isotopes of caesium, strontium and iodine are treated in greatest detail. 22 refs, 12 figs, 10 tabs.
Authors:
Attwood, C; Fayers, C; Mayall, A; Brown, J; Simmonds, J R [1] 
  1. National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1996
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-904
Reference Number:
SCA: 220502; 553004; 560101; PA: AIX-28:013036; EDB-97:025766; SN: 97001730593
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Sep 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Validation of models using Chernobyl fallout data from southern Finland. Scenario S. Second report of the VAMP multiple pathways assessment working group. Part of the IAEA/CEC co-ordinated research programme on the validation of environmental model predictions (VAMP); PB: 483 p.
Subject:
22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; FALLOUT DEPOSITS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; VALIDATION; AIR POLLUTION; CESIUM 137; CHERNOBYLSK-4 REACTOR; COMPILED DATA; CROPS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; FARMS; FOOD; FOOD CHAINS; FORECASTING; FORESTS; MEAT; MILK; RADIOECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; REMEDIAL ACTION; SITE CHARACTERIZATION
OSTI ID:
424824
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1011-4289; Other: ON: DE97612492; TRN: XA9642931013036
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE97612492
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 199-236
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Attwood, C, Fayers, C, Mayall, A, Brown, J, and Simmonds, J R. FARMLAND: Model description and evaluation of model performance. IAEA: N. p., 1996. Web.
Attwood, C, Fayers, C, Mayall, A, Brown, J, & Simmonds, J R. FARMLAND: Model description and evaluation of model performance. IAEA.
Attwood, C, Fayers, C, Mayall, A, Brown, J, and Simmonds, J R. 1996. "FARMLAND: Model description and evaluation of model performance." IAEA.
@misc{etde_424824,
title = {FARMLAND: Model description and evaluation of model performance}
author = {Attwood, C, Fayers, C, Mayall, A, Brown, J, and Simmonds, J R}
abstractNote = {The FARMLAND model was originally developed for use in connection with continuous, routine releases of radionuclides, but because it has many time-dependent features it has been developed further for a single accidental release. The most recent version of FARMLAND is flexible and can be used to predict activity concentrations in food as a function of time after both accidental and routine releases of radionuclides. The effect of deposition at different times of the year can be taken into account. FARMLAND contains a suite of models which simulate radionuclide transfer through different parts of the foodchain. The models can be used in different combinations and offer the flexibility to assess a variety of radiological situations. The main foods considered are green vegetables, grain products, root vegetables, milk, meat and offal from cattle, and meat and offal from sheep. A large variety of elements can be considered although the degree of complexity with which some are modelled is greater than others; isotopes of caesium, strontium and iodine are treated in greatest detail. 22 refs, 12 figs, 10 tabs.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1996}
month = {Sep}
}