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Moessbauer spectroscopy in space

Journal Article:

Abstract

Nearly 40 years after the discovery of the Moessbauer effect for the first time a Moessbauer spectrometer will leave our planet to explore in situ the surface of another solar system body: the red planet Mars [1]. We are currently developing a miniaturized Moessbauer spectrometer (MIMOS) which is part of the scientific payload of the Russian Mars96 mission, to be launched within the next 2-4 years [2,3]. To fulfill the requirements for a space mission to the planet Mars, all parts of the spectrometer had to be extremely miniaturized and ruggedized to withstand the space flight and Mars environmental conditions. The relevant parts (e.g. drive, detector system, electronics etc.) will be described in more detail and its characteristics compared to standard systems. Because of this new development there now is a growing interest to include a Moessbauer (MB) instrument in future space missions to other solar system bodies as for instance Venus, the terrestrial Moon, and a comet nucleus. Because of extremely different environmental conditions (e.g. nearly zero gravity on the surface of a comet nucleus, high pressure and temperature on the surface of Venus, etc.) different instrument designs and concepts are required for different missions. We will present some  More>>
Authors:
Klingelhoefer, G; [1]  Held, P; [1]  Teucher, R; [1]  Schlichting, F; [1]  Foh, J; [1]  Kankeleit, E [1] 
  1. Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 1995
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
CONF-9405305-
Reference Number:
SCA: 665100; 661300; PA: CHN-95:0F7966; EDB-95:074734; SN: 95001385790
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Hyperfine Interactions; Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 1-4; Conference: 4. Seeheim workshop on Moessbauer spectroscopy, Seeheim (Germany), 24-28 May 1994; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1995
Subject:
66 PHYSICS; MOESSBAUER SPECTROMETERS; USES; MARS PLANET; MOESSBAUER EFFECT; COMETS; MOON; PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES; SOLAR SYSTEM; SPACE FLIGHT; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE
OSTI ID:
40883
Country of Origin:
Switzerland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: HYINDN; ISSN 0304-3843; TRN: CH95F7966
Submitting Site:
CHN
Size:
pp. 305-339
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Klingelhoefer, G, Held, P, Teucher, R, Schlichting, F, Foh, J, and Kankeleit, E. Moessbauer spectroscopy in space. Switzerland: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1007/BF02146322.
Klingelhoefer, G, Held, P, Teucher, R, Schlichting, F, Foh, J, & Kankeleit, E. Moessbauer spectroscopy in space. Switzerland. doi:10.1007/BF02146322.
Klingelhoefer, G, Held, P, Teucher, R, Schlichting, F, Foh, J, and Kankeleit, E. 1995. "Moessbauer spectroscopy in space." Switzerland. doi:10.1007/BF02146322. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1007/BF02146322.
@misc{etde_40883,
title = {Moessbauer spectroscopy in space}
author = {Klingelhoefer, G, Held, P, Teucher, R, Schlichting, F, Foh, J, and Kankeleit, E}
abstractNote = {Nearly 40 years after the discovery of the Moessbauer effect for the first time a Moessbauer spectrometer will leave our planet to explore in situ the surface of another solar system body: the red planet Mars [1]. We are currently developing a miniaturized Moessbauer spectrometer (MIMOS) which is part of the scientific payload of the Russian Mars96 mission, to be launched within the next 2-4 years [2,3]. To fulfill the requirements for a space mission to the planet Mars, all parts of the spectrometer had to be extremely miniaturized and ruggedized to withstand the space flight and Mars environmental conditions. The relevant parts (e.g. drive, detector system, electronics etc.) will be described in more detail and its characteristics compared to standard systems. Because of this new development there now is a growing interest to include a Moessbauer (MB) instrument in future space missions to other solar system bodies as for instance Venus, the terrestrial Moon, and a comet nucleus. Because of extremely different environmental conditions (e.g. nearly zero gravity on the surface of a comet nucleus, high pressure and temperature on the surface of Venus, etc.) different instrument designs and concepts are required for different missions. We will present some ideas for various types of missions, as well as the motivation for using Moessbauer spectroscopy in these cases. (orig.)}
doi = {10.1007/BF02146322}
journal = {Hyperfine Interactions}
issue = {1-4}
volume = {95}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Switzerland}
year = {1995}
month = {Mar}
}