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Quantifying biomass production in crops grown for energy

Abstract

One estimate suggests that continued CAP (Common Agricultural Policy) reform may lead to as much as 2 million hectares of land set aside from arable production by the year 2020 in the UK alone, with 20 million hectares in the EU in total. Set-aside currently occupies more than 500,000 hectares in the UK. Set-aside land is providing more opportunities for non-food crops, for example fuel crops, which provide biomass for energy. Whilst any crop species will produce biomass which can be burnt to produce energy, arable crops were not developed with this in mind but rather a specific harvestable commodity, e.g. grain, and therefore the total harvestable commodity is seldom maximised. The characteristics of an ideal fuel crop have been identified as: dry harvested material for efficient combustion; perennial growth to minimise establishment costs and lengthen the growing season; good disease resistance; efficient conversion of solar radiation to biomass energy; efficient use of nitrogen fertiliser (where required) and water; and yield close to the theoretical maximum. Miscanthus, a genus of Oriental and African C4 perennial grasses, has been identified as possessing the above characteristics. There may be other species, which, if not yielding quite as much biomass, have other characteristics  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1996
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
ETSU-B-CR-00387/REP
Reference Number:
EDB-97:006369
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1996
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOMASS; CROPS; PRODUCTION; ENERGY RECOVERY
Sponsoring Organizations:
Department of Trade and Industry, London (United Kingdom)
OSTI ID:
408562
Research Organizations:
Agricultural Development and Advisory Service (ADAS), London (United Kingdom)
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: GB9651777
Availability:
Available from The British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorks. LS23 7BQ; Available to ETDE participating countries only(see www.etde.org); commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE408562
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
64 p.
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Bullard, M J, Christian, D, and Wilkins, C. Quantifying biomass production in crops grown for energy. United Kingdom: N. p., 1996. Web.
Bullard, M J, Christian, D, & Wilkins, C. Quantifying biomass production in crops grown for energy. United Kingdom.
Bullard, M J, Christian, D, and Wilkins, C. 1996. "Quantifying biomass production in crops grown for energy." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_408562,
title = {Quantifying biomass production in crops grown for energy}
author = {Bullard, M J, Christian, D, and Wilkins, C}
abstractNote = {One estimate suggests that continued CAP (Common Agricultural Policy) reform may lead to as much as 2 million hectares of land set aside from arable production by the year 2020 in the UK alone, with 20 million hectares in the EU in total. Set-aside currently occupies more than 500,000 hectares in the UK. Set-aside land is providing more opportunities for non-food crops, for example fuel crops, which provide biomass for energy. Whilst any crop species will produce biomass which can be burnt to produce energy, arable crops were not developed with this in mind but rather a specific harvestable commodity, e.g. grain, and therefore the total harvestable commodity is seldom maximised. The characteristics of an ideal fuel crop have been identified as: dry harvested material for efficient combustion; perennial growth to minimise establishment costs and lengthen the growing season; good disease resistance; efficient conversion of solar radiation to biomass energy; efficient use of nitrogen fertiliser (where required) and water; and yield close to the theoretical maximum. Miscanthus, a genus of Oriental and African C4 perennial grasses, has been identified as possessing the above characteristics. There may be other species, which, if not yielding quite as much biomass, have other characteristics of merit. This has led to the need to identify inherently productive species which are adapted to the UK, and to validate the productivity of species which have already been 'discovered'. (author)}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1996}
month = {Dec}
}