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Flow fields in the supersonic through-flow fan. Comparison of the solutions of the linear potential theory and the numerical solution of the Euler equations; Choonsoku tsukaryu fan nai no nagareba. Senkei potential rironkai to Euler hoteishiki no suchikai no hikaku

Journal Article:

Abstract

Comparison study between solutions of a linear potential theory and numerical solution of Euler equations was made for flow in a supersonic through-flow fan. In numerical fluid dynamic technique, Euler equations are solved by finite difference method under the assumption of air and perfect gas fluid, and neglected viscosity and thermal conductivity of fluid. As a result, in a linear potential theory, expansion wave was regarded as equipotential discontinuous surface, while in Euler numerical solution, it was regarded as finite pressure gradient where a wave front fans out toward downstream. The latter reflection point of shock wave on a wing existed upstream as compared with the former reflection point. The shock wave angle was dominated by Euler equations, and different from the Mach line of a linear potential theory in both angle and discontinuous quantities in front and behind. Both calculated solutions well agreed with each other until the first reflection point of the Mach line, however, thereafter the difference between them increased toward downstream. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.
Authors:
Yamasaki, N; Nanba, M; Tashiro, K [1] 
  1. Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering
Publication Date:
Mar 27, 1996
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
SCA: 420400; PA: NEDO-96:930177; EDB-97:003963; SN: 96001702306
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Kyushu Daigaku Kogaku Shuho (Technology Reports of the Kyushu University); Journal Volume: 69; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: 27 Mar 1996
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; SUPERSONIC FLOW; AIR FLOW; TURBOFAN ENGINES; FLUID MECHANICS; ANALYTICAL SOLUTION; NUMERICAL SOLUTION; FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD; PRESSURE GRADIENTS; SHOCK WAVES; MACH NUMBER
OSTI ID:
401576
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
Japanese
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: KDKSBY; ISSN 0023-2718; TRN: 96:930177
Submitting Site:
NEDO
Size:
pp. 17-31
Announcement Date:
Dec 17, 1996

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Yamasaki, N, Nanba, M, and Tashiro, K. Flow fields in the supersonic through-flow fan. Comparison of the solutions of the linear potential theory and the numerical solution of the Euler equations; Choonsoku tsukaryu fan nai no nagareba. Senkei potential rironkai to Euler hoteishiki no suchikai no hikaku. Japan: N. p., 1996. Web.
Yamasaki, N, Nanba, M, & Tashiro, K. Flow fields in the supersonic through-flow fan. Comparison of the solutions of the linear potential theory and the numerical solution of the Euler equations; Choonsoku tsukaryu fan nai no nagareba. Senkei potential rironkai to Euler hoteishiki no suchikai no hikaku. Japan.
Yamasaki, N, Nanba, M, and Tashiro, K. 1996. "Flow fields in the supersonic through-flow fan. Comparison of the solutions of the linear potential theory and the numerical solution of the Euler equations; Choonsoku tsukaryu fan nai no nagareba. Senkei potential rironkai to Euler hoteishiki no suchikai no hikaku." Japan.
@misc{etde_401576,
title = {Flow fields in the supersonic through-flow fan. Comparison of the solutions of the linear potential theory and the numerical solution of the Euler equations; Choonsoku tsukaryu fan nai no nagareba. Senkei potential rironkai to Euler hoteishiki no suchikai no hikaku}
author = {Yamasaki, N, Nanba, M, and Tashiro, K}
abstractNote = {Comparison study between solutions of a linear potential theory and numerical solution of Euler equations was made for flow in a supersonic through-flow fan. In numerical fluid dynamic technique, Euler equations are solved by finite difference method under the assumption of air and perfect gas fluid, and neglected viscosity and thermal conductivity of fluid. As a result, in a linear potential theory, expansion wave was regarded as equipotential discontinuous surface, while in Euler numerical solution, it was regarded as finite pressure gradient where a wave front fans out toward downstream. The latter reflection point of shock wave on a wing existed upstream as compared with the former reflection point. The shock wave angle was dominated by Euler equations, and different from the Mach line of a linear potential theory in both angle and discontinuous quantities in front and behind. Both calculated solutions well agreed with each other until the first reflection point of the Mach line, however, thereafter the difference between them increased toward downstream. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.}
journal = {Kyushu Daigaku Kogaku Shuho (Technology Reports of the Kyushu University)}
issue = {2}
volume = {69}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1996}
month = {Mar}
}