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Radiation disinfection or disinfestation of nematodes, aphids, mites, thrips, and other pests on food plant materials: evaluation for effectiveness and product quality

Abstract

Many fresh herbs, ornamental plants, and several varieties of taro grown in Hawaii are infested with various pests such as aphids, mites, thrips, and nematodes. Finding an efficacious quarantine treatment for these commodities is difficult because most cannot tolerate heat or cold, and a suitable chemical treatment is lacking. Irradiation could be a feasible, practical alternative. Quality of these irradiated materials should be studied to help determine if irradiation is a suitable quarantine treatment. Of the ten fresh herbs irradiated with up to 0.70 kGy, five (rosemary, thyme, oregano, parsley, chives) are very tolerant, and show no difference from the controls after two to three weeks at 7 deg. C. Red ginger and four cultivars of heliconia, very attractive ornamental plants, can be irradiated at 0.75 and 0.50 kGy, respectively, and have a vase life of 10 days or more at 21 deg. C. Leafminer in bean plants cannot emerge when irradiated at 0.15 kGy. The nematode, Meloidogyne javanica, which infects taro and ginger, is prevalent in Hawaii. To cause mortality in second stage juveniles (J2), a gamma-radiation dose higher than 4.0 kGy is necessary. Suppression of hatching of egg masses requires doses of 2.0 kGy and above. Galling of  More>>
Authors:
Moy, J H; Chinnasri, B; Sipes, B S; Schmitt, D P; Hamasaki, R T; Mersino, E F; Yamakawa, R M [1] 
  1. Hawaii Institute of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)
Publication Date:
May 01, 1999
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-1082; CONF-9711237-
Reference Number:
SCA: 553003; 553004; 560140; PA: AIX-30:023910; EDB-99:057028; SN: 99002097789
Resource Relation:
Conference: Final research co-ordination meeting on irradiation as a quarantine treatment of arthropod pests, Honolulu, HI (United States), 3-7 Nov 1997; Other Information: DN: 10 refs, 3 tabs; PBD: May 1999; Related Information: Is Part Of Irradiation as a quarantine treatment of arthropod pests. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting; PB: 180 p.
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; APHIDS; FLOWERS; IRRADIATION; NEMATODES; PEST CONTROL; QUALITY ASSURANCE; QUARANTINE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOPRESERVATION; RADIOSENSITIVITY; TOMATOES
OSTI ID:
343522
Research Organizations:
Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1011-4289; Other: ON: DE99623519; CNN: Research Agreement 6944/CF; TRN: XA9950290023910
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE99623519
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 105-113
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Moy, J H, Chinnasri, B, Sipes, B S, Schmitt, D P, Hamasaki, R T, Mersino, E F, and Yamakawa, R M. Radiation disinfection or disinfestation of nematodes, aphids, mites, thrips, and other pests on food plant materials: evaluation for effectiveness and product quality. IAEA: N. p., 1999. Web.
Moy, J H, Chinnasri, B, Sipes, B S, Schmitt, D P, Hamasaki, R T, Mersino, E F, & Yamakawa, R M. Radiation disinfection or disinfestation of nematodes, aphids, mites, thrips, and other pests on food plant materials: evaluation for effectiveness and product quality. IAEA.
Moy, J H, Chinnasri, B, Sipes, B S, Schmitt, D P, Hamasaki, R T, Mersino, E F, and Yamakawa, R M. 1999. "Radiation disinfection or disinfestation of nematodes, aphids, mites, thrips, and other pests on food plant materials: evaluation for effectiveness and product quality." IAEA.
@misc{etde_343522,
title = {Radiation disinfection or disinfestation of nematodes, aphids, mites, thrips, and other pests on food plant materials: evaluation for effectiveness and product quality}
author = {Moy, J H, Chinnasri, B, Sipes, B S, Schmitt, D P, Hamasaki, R T, Mersino, E F, and Yamakawa, R M}
abstractNote = {Many fresh herbs, ornamental plants, and several varieties of taro grown in Hawaii are infested with various pests such as aphids, mites, thrips, and nematodes. Finding an efficacious quarantine treatment for these commodities is difficult because most cannot tolerate heat or cold, and a suitable chemical treatment is lacking. Irradiation could be a feasible, practical alternative. Quality of these irradiated materials should be studied to help determine if irradiation is a suitable quarantine treatment. Of the ten fresh herbs irradiated with up to 0.70 kGy, five (rosemary, thyme, oregano, parsley, chives) are very tolerant, and show no difference from the controls after two to three weeks at 7 deg. C. Red ginger and four cultivars of heliconia, very attractive ornamental plants, can be irradiated at 0.75 and 0.50 kGy, respectively, and have a vase life of 10 days or more at 21 deg. C. Leafminer in bean plants cannot emerge when irradiated at 0.15 kGy. The nematode, Meloidogyne javanica, which infects taro and ginger, is prevalent in Hawaii. To cause mortality in second stage juveniles (J2), a gamma-radiation dose higher than 4.0 kGy is necessary. Suppression of hatching of egg masses requires doses of 2.0 kGy and above. Galling of tomato plants inoculated with J2 and egg masses decreases when J2 and egg masses were irradiated at 3.25 kGy and above. Heating J2 at 43 deg. C for 10 min before inoculating them into the plants effectively reduces root galling. Synergism was not found between heat treatment (49 deg. C for 10 or 20 min) and irradiation with up to 0.015 kGy, the dose above which sprouting of ginger rhizomes and taro cormels is inhibited. The results suggest that irradiation is promising as a quarantine treatment for selected fresh herbs and ornamental plants, but not for control of nematodes in root crops. (author) 10 refs, 3 tabs}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1999}
month = {May}
}