You need JavaScript to view this

Biomass energy resource enhancement

Abstract

The demand for energy in developing countries is expected to increase to at least three times its present level within the next 25 years. If this demand is to be met by fossil fuels, an additional 2 billion tonnes of crude oil or 3 billion tonnes of coal would be needed every year. This consumption pattern, if allowed to proceed, would add 10 billion tonnes of CO{sub 2}, to the global atmosphere each year, with its attendant risk of global warming. Therefore, just for our survival, it is imperative to progressively replace fossil fuels by biomass energy resources and to enhance the efficiency of use of the latter. Biomass is not only environmentally benign but is also abundant. It is being photosynthesised at the rate of 200 billion tonnes of carbon every year, which is equivalent to 10 times the world`s present demand for energy. Presently, biomass energy resources are highly under-utilised in developing countries; when they are used it is through combustion, which is inefficient and causes widespread environmental pollution with its associated health hazards. Owing to the low bulk density and high moisture content of biomass, which make it difficult to collect, transport and store, as well as  More>>
Authors:
Grover, P D [1] 
  1. Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India)
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1995
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XT-001; CONF-9512165-
Reference Number:
SCA: 093000; PA: AIX-30:019821; EDB-99:049003; SN: 99002090887
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on development and utilization of biomass energy resources in developing countries, Vienna (Austria), 11-14 Dec 1995; Other Information: DN: 10 refs, 4 figs; PBD: Dec 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Symposium on development and utilization of biomass energy resources in developing countries. Proceedings. V. 1: Thematic papers; PB: 364 p.
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOMASS; CARBON OXIDES; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY POLICY; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS
OSTI ID:
340401
Research Organizations:
United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
UNIDO
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE99621757; TRN: XT9900014019821
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE99621757
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 122-134
Announcement Date:
May 26, 1999

Citation Formats

Grover, P D. Biomass energy resource enhancement. UNIDO: N. p., 1995. Web.
Grover, P D. Biomass energy resource enhancement. UNIDO.
Grover, P D. 1995. "Biomass energy resource enhancement." UNIDO.
@misc{etde_340401,
title = {Biomass energy resource enhancement}
author = {Grover, P D}
abstractNote = {The demand for energy in developing countries is expected to increase to at least three times its present level within the next 25 years. If this demand is to be met by fossil fuels, an additional 2 billion tonnes of crude oil or 3 billion tonnes of coal would be needed every year. This consumption pattern, if allowed to proceed, would add 10 billion tonnes of CO{sub 2}, to the global atmosphere each year, with its attendant risk of global warming. Therefore, just for our survival, it is imperative to progressively replace fossil fuels by biomass energy resources and to enhance the efficiency of use of the latter. Biomass is not only environmentally benign but is also abundant. It is being photosynthesised at the rate of 200 billion tonnes of carbon every year, which is equivalent to 10 times the world`s present demand for energy. Presently, biomass energy resources are highly under-utilised in developing countries; when they are used it is through combustion, which is inefficient and causes widespread environmental pollution with its associated health hazards. Owing to the low bulk density and high moisture content of biomass, which make it difficult to collect, transport and store, as well as its ash-related thermochemical properties, its biodegradability and seasonal availability, the industrial use of biomass is limited to small and (some) medium-scale industries, most of which are unable to afford efficient but often costly energy conversion systems. Considering these constraints and the need to enhance the use base, biomass energy technologies appropriate to developing countries have been identified. Technologies such as briquetting and densification to upgrade biomass fuels are being adopted as conventional measures in some developing countries. The biomass energy base can be enhanced only once these technologies have been shown to be viable under local conditions and with local raw materials, after which they will multiply on their own, as has been the case with briquetting technology in India. To set up the first units, private industries from both developed and developing countries will have to play a dominant role, with assistance from international funding organizations and their respective Governments. Manufacturing activities should gradually be transferred to developing countries, under licensing agreements, because plants installed by developed countries tend to be more expensive and economically unviable. This approach has been successfully practiced for other technologies and will be addressed in this paper. Used sustainably, biomass resource can help to meet the growing demand for energy. (author) 10 refs, 4 figs}
place = {UNIDO}
year = {1995}
month = {Dec}
}