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Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

Abstract

The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep  More>>
Authors:
Golian, C; [1]  Lever, D A; Baker, A J; Connell, L D; [2]  Bennett, D G; Read, D; [3]  Lindgreen, M; Pers, K; Skagius, K; [4]  Murakami, T; Ohnuki, T [5] 
  1. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)
  2. AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom)
  3. WS Atkins Science and Technology Epsom Surrey (United Kingdom)
  4. Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden)
  5. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI (Japan)
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1992
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-AU-0024; DOE/HMIP/RR-92/084; SKI-TR-92/20/14
Reference Number:
SCA: 540230; PA: AIX-30:004649; EDB-99:026369; SN: 99002061776
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1992
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACTIVITY LEVELS; FLOW MODELS; GEOLOGIC MODELS; GROUND WATER; KOONGARRA DEPOSIT; NATURAL ANALOGUE; NUMERICAL SOLUTION; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; ROCK-FLUID INTERACTIONS; SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS; SIMULATION; THEORETICAL DATA; THORIUM 232; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; URANIUM 234; URANIUM 238; URANIUM ORES
Sponsoring Organizations:
Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Nuclear Energy Agency, 75 - Paris (France); Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Department of the Environment, London (United Kingdom)
OSTI ID:
310064
Research Organizations:
Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE99612874; TRN: AU9917764004649
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE99612874
Submitting Site:
AUN
Size:
284 p.
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Golian, C, Lever, D A, Baker, A J, Connell, L D, Bennett, D G, Read, D, Lindgreen, M, Pers, K, Skagius, K, Murakami, T, and Ohnuki, T. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14. Australia: N. p., 1992. Web.
Golian, C, Lever, D A, Baker, A J, Connell, L D, Bennett, D G, Read, D, Lindgreen, M, Pers, K, Skagius, K, Murakami, T, & Ohnuki, T. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14. Australia.
Golian, C, Lever, D A, Baker, A J, Connell, L D, Bennett, D G, Read, D, Lindgreen, M, Pers, K, Skagius, K, Murakami, T, and Ohnuki, T. 1992. "Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14." Australia.
@misc{etde_310064,
title = {Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14}
author = {Golian, C, Lever, D A, Baker, A J, Connell, L D, Bennett, D G, Read, D, Lindgreen, M, Pers, K, Skagius, K, Murakami, T, and Ohnuki, T}
abstractNote = {The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that {sup 234}U is preferentially mobile relative to {sup 238}U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater, thus leading to ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U){sub r} less than one. Other models explain the observations by invoking the presence of a phase in which {sup 234}Th is irreversibly fixed}
place = {Australia}
year = {1992}
month = {Dec}
}