You need JavaScript to view this

Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

Abstract

The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1  More>>
Authors:
Wiebe, L I [1] 
  1. University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1997
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-AU-0011(v.2); CONF-9710130-
Reference Number:
SCA: 550604; PA: AIX-29:057269; EDB-99:021296; SN: 98002023290
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. international conference on isotopes, Sydney (Australia), 12-16 Oct 1997; Other Information: PBD: Oct 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings; Hardy, C.J. [ed.]; PB: 273 p.
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; DIAGNOSIS; GENES; MOLECULAR BIOLOGY; MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES; NEOPLASMS; PHOSPHOTRANSFERASES; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; THERAPY; THYMIDINE
OSTI ID:
307588
Research Organizations:
Australian Nuclear Association Inc., Sutherland, NSW (Australia)
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE99604261; TRN: AU9817385057269
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE99604261
Submitting Site:
AUN
Size:
pp. 103-108
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Wiebe, L I. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy. Australia: N. p., 1997. Web.
Wiebe, L I. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy. Australia.
Wiebe, L I. 1997. "Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy." Australia.
@misc{etde_307588,
title = {Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy}
author = {Wiebe, L I}
abstractNote = {The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified}
place = {Australia}
year = {1997}
month = {Oct}
}