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Effect of duration of exposure to RaCl{sub 2} and a radium apatite from freshwater mussels on intestinal transport and bone deposition of radium

Abstract

Natural leaching of uranium ore bodies can result in {sup 226}Ra pollution of adjacent waterways and consequent incorporation of radium into the food chain. Mining has the potential to augment this effect. In the Magela flood plain, Northern Territory, the freshwater mussel (Velesunio angasi) concentrates radium in its tissues as a phosphate compound. The availability of mussel radium for uptake and tissue incorporation was assessed relative to radium chloride using rats. The results were compared for jejunal transport (in situ in vivo, ligated segment using anaesthetised animals) and feed trial experiments. In addition, the influence of age and duration of dosage (hours in the case of the jejunal transport and weeks in the feed trial studies) were investigated. Mussel radium transport across the jejunum of adults and juveniles (<0.3%) was very small when compared to radium chloride (50% injected dose). The amount of mussel radium available for intestinal uptake in the feed trials was also low (<0.5%) but significant when compared to the uptake of radium chloride (< 1.5%). Incorporation of mussel radium into bone was less than that of radium chloride (p=0.0001) for both adults and juveniles. Extrapolation of the data from the animal model to humans suggests that  More>>
Authors:
Domel, R U; [1]  Beal, A M [2] 
  1. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organsiation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Environment Division
  2. University of New South Wales, NSW (Australia). Biological Science
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1997
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-AU-0011(v.2); CONF-9710130-
Reference Number:
SCA: 560162; PA: AIX-29:057250; EDB-99:021397; SN: 98002023271
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. international conference on isotopes, Sydney (Australia), 12-16 Oct 1997; Other Information: DN: 18 refs., 5 figs.; PBD: Oct 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings; Hardy, C.J. [ed.]; PB: 273 p.
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; AGE DEPENDENCE; APATITES; BIOLOGICAL LOCALIZATION; BIOLOGICAL MODELS; BONE TISSUES; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; FOOD CHAINS; LEACHING; MUSSELS; NORTHERN TERRITORY; RADIOECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; RADIONUCLIDE KINETICS; RADIUM; RADIUM CHLORIDES; RATS; RETENTION; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; UPTAKE; URANIUM DEPOSITS
OSTI ID:
307559
Research Organizations:
Australian Nuclear Association Inc., Sutherland, NSW (Australia)
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE99604261; TRN: AU9817366057250
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE99604261
Submitting Site:
AUN
Size:
pp. 16-22
Announcement Date:
Feb 24, 1999

Citation Formats

Domel, R U, and Beal, A M. Effect of duration of exposure to RaCl{sub 2} and a radium apatite from freshwater mussels on intestinal transport and bone deposition of radium. Australia: N. p., 1997. Web.
Domel, R U, & Beal, A M. Effect of duration of exposure to RaCl{sub 2} and a radium apatite from freshwater mussels on intestinal transport and bone deposition of radium. Australia.
Domel, R U, and Beal, A M. 1997. "Effect of duration of exposure to RaCl{sub 2} and a radium apatite from freshwater mussels on intestinal transport and bone deposition of radium." Australia.
@misc{etde_307559,
title = {Effect of duration of exposure to RaCl{sub 2} and a radium apatite from freshwater mussels on intestinal transport and bone deposition of radium}
author = {Domel, R U, and Beal, A M}
abstractNote = {Natural leaching of uranium ore bodies can result in {sup 226}Ra pollution of adjacent waterways and consequent incorporation of radium into the food chain. Mining has the potential to augment this effect. In the Magela flood plain, Northern Territory, the freshwater mussel (Velesunio angasi) concentrates radium in its tissues as a phosphate compound. The availability of mussel radium for uptake and tissue incorporation was assessed relative to radium chloride using rats. The results were compared for jejunal transport (in situ in vivo, ligated segment using anaesthetised animals) and feed trial experiments. In addition, the influence of age and duration of dosage (hours in the case of the jejunal transport and weeks in the feed trial studies) were investigated. Mussel radium transport across the jejunum of adults and juveniles (<0.3%) was very small when compared to radium chloride (50% injected dose). The amount of mussel radium available for intestinal uptake in the feed trials was also low (<0.5%) but significant when compared to the uptake of radium chloride (< 1.5%). Incorporation of mussel radium into bone was less than that of radium chloride (p=0.0001) for both adults and juveniles. Extrapolation of the data from the animal model to humans suggests that eating these mussels carries with it only a low risk of exceeding the Annual Limit of Intake (ALI) set for members of the public, even in juveniles 18 refs., 5 figs.}
place = {Australia}
year = {1997}
month = {Oct}
}