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Effects of acid deposition on tree roots

Abstract

Large forest regions in SW Sweden have been exposed to high levels of acid deposition for many decades, causing soil acidification in forest soils. Historically, SO{sub 2} has been the major acidification agent, but lately nitrogen compounds increasingly have become important. The amount and chemical form of nitrogen strongly affects the pH in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane. Many forest stands show a positive growth response to increased nitrogen input, even in heavily N-loaded areas. Nitrogen fertilization experiments suggest that part of the increased forest production is caused by a translocation of biomass production from below-ground to above-ground parts. At the same time fine-root growth dynamics are strongly affected by the high N supply. Deficiencies of various nutrients (Mg,Ca,K,Mn and Zn) obtained from needle analyses have been reported from different Picea abies stands. In areas with more extensive acidification and nutrient leaching, a decline in tree vitality has been observed. Although deficiency symptoms in forest trees may be reflected in nitrogen/cation ratios in fine roots, few attempts have been made to explain forest damage symptoms from fine-root chemistry. Root damage is often described as a decline in the amount of living fine roots, an increase in the amount of dead versus  More>>
Authors:
Persson, H [1] 
  1. Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1995
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
NEI-FI-290-Vol.3; CONF-9505322-Vol.3
Reference Number:
SCA: 540120; 540220; PA: FI-96:003562; EDB-96:137178; SN: 96001645551
Resource Relation:
Conference: 10. world clean air congress, Espoo (Finland), 28 May - 2 Jun 1995; Other Information: DN: Sponsored by the International Union of Air Pollution Prevention and Environmental Protection Associations (UIAPPA) and hosted by the Finnish Air Pollution Prevention Society (FAPPS); PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 10th world clean air congress. Atmospheric pollution; Anttila, P.; Kaemaeri, J.; Tolvanen, M. [eds.]; PB: 632 p.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACID RAIN; AIR POLLUTION; ROOTS; TREES; FORESTS; NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY; NUTRIENTS; SOIL CHEMISTRY; NITROGEN
OSTI ID:
283468
Research Organizations:
Finnish Air Pollution Prevention Society, Helsinki (Finland)
Country of Origin:
Finland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE96777170; ISBN 952-90-6474-8; TRN: FI9603562
Availability:
OSTI as DE96777170
Submitting Site:
FI
Size:
pp. [4]
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Persson, H. Effects of acid deposition on tree roots. Finland: N. p., 1995. Web.
Persson, H. Effects of acid deposition on tree roots. Finland.
Persson, H. 1995. "Effects of acid deposition on tree roots." Finland.
@misc{etde_283468,
title = {Effects of acid deposition on tree roots}
author = {Persson, H}
abstractNote = {Large forest regions in SW Sweden have been exposed to high levels of acid deposition for many decades, causing soil acidification in forest soils. Historically, SO{sub 2} has been the major acidification agent, but lately nitrogen compounds increasingly have become important. The amount and chemical form of nitrogen strongly affects the pH in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane. Many forest stands show a positive growth response to increased nitrogen input, even in heavily N-loaded areas. Nitrogen fertilization experiments suggest that part of the increased forest production is caused by a translocation of biomass production from below-ground to above-ground parts. At the same time fine-root growth dynamics are strongly affected by the high N supply. Deficiencies of various nutrients (Mg,Ca,K,Mn and Zn) obtained from needle analyses have been reported from different Picea abies stands. In areas with more extensive acidification and nutrient leaching, a decline in tree vitality has been observed. Although deficiency symptoms in forest trees may be reflected in nitrogen/cation ratios in fine roots, few attempts have been made to explain forest damage symptoms from fine-root chemistry. Root damage is often described as a decline in the amount of living fine roots, an increase in the amount of dead versus live fine roots (a lower live/dead ratio) and an increasing amount of dead medium and coarse roots. The primary objectives of the present presentation were to analyse available data on the effects of high nitrogen and sulphur deposition on mineral nutrient balance in tree fine roots and to evaluate the risk of Al interference with cation uptake by roots}
place = {Finland}
year = {1995}
month = {Dec}
}