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Barriers to investment in emerging power markets

Abstract

Investing in private power projects in developing countries is a very different issue from investment in the US or the UK. There are many investment barriers not present in developed nations. Firstly investment barriers need to be identified. Trouble may be encountered with legal authorization; the regulatory framework; government guarantees; fuel supply security; lender protection; labour laws and local commercial restrictions such as profits repatriation, currency convertibility, and taxes. Political barriers may also be encountered in the form of: government commitments and support; funding sources; political unrest; religion; and relationships with other countries. Investment barriers may be minimised by persuading the government to remove any legal barriers; the contract has then to be agreed. Factors in a successful contract include: power purchase agreements; fuel agreements; and implementation agreements. It is vital to have a source of information on local rules and customs, by working with local companies and employing local attorneys.
Authors:
Beardsworth, Jr, J J [1] 
  1. Hunton and Williams, Richmond, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1994
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-931140-
Reference Number:
SCA: 015000; 296000; PA: CLA-95:040378; EDB-95:055196; SN: 95001365810
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. IEA international conference on the clean and efficient use of coal and lignite: its role in energy, environment and life, Hong Kong (Hong Kong), 29 Nov - 3 Dec 1993; Other Information: DN: IEACR LIB; PBD: 1994; Related Information: Is Part Of The clean and efficient use of coal and lignite: its role in energy, environment and life; PB: 1183 p.
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; INVESTMENT; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; POLITICAL ASPECTS; FINANCING; PROFITS; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; OWNERSHIP; FOREIGN POLICY; LAWS; CONSTRAINTS; LEGAL ASPECTS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; FUEL SUPPLIES; SECURITY; LABOR RELATIONS
OSTI ID:
26765
Research Organizations:
No corporate text available (Country unknown/Code not available)
Country of Origin:
OE
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 92-64-14243-6; TRN: 950400378
Availability:
OECD/IEA, Paris (France)
Submitting Site:
CLA
Size:
pp. 289-301
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Beardsworth, Jr, J J. Barriers to investment in emerging power markets. OE: N. p., 1994. Web.
Beardsworth, Jr, J J. Barriers to investment in emerging power markets. OE.
Beardsworth, Jr, J J. 1994. "Barriers to investment in emerging power markets." OE.
@misc{etde_26765,
title = {Barriers to investment in emerging power markets}
author = {Beardsworth, Jr, J J}
abstractNote = {Investing in private power projects in developing countries is a very different issue from investment in the US or the UK. There are many investment barriers not present in developed nations. Firstly investment barriers need to be identified. Trouble may be encountered with legal authorization; the regulatory framework; government guarantees; fuel supply security; lender protection; labour laws and local commercial restrictions such as profits repatriation, currency convertibility, and taxes. Political barriers may also be encountered in the form of: government commitments and support; funding sources; political unrest; religion; and relationships with other countries. Investment barriers may be minimised by persuading the government to remove any legal barriers; the contract has then to be agreed. Factors in a successful contract include: power purchase agreements; fuel agreements; and implementation agreements. It is vital to have a source of information on local rules and customs, by working with local companies and employing local attorneys.}
place = {OE}
year = {1994}
month = {Dec}
}